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Stakeholders weigh in on pros, cons of Inflation Reduction Act

August 12, 2022

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Senate earlier this week passed a massive climate, tax and health care bill with an agriculture title totaling nearly $40 billion. The Inflation Reduction Act now heads to the U.S. House for consideration. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has indicated the House will pass the bill today.

“The House should pass this as soon as possible, and I look forward to signing it into law,” President Biden said following Senate passage of the legislation.

Matt Herrick, senior vice president for public affairs and communication at the International Dairy Foods Association, says the Inflation Reduction Act includes significant funding to support ongoing efforts by U.S. dairy to meet ambitious environmental stewardship goals.

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) commended the inclusion of $20 billion in new funding for USDA conservation programs included in the legislation. The funding, spearheaded by Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., will help dairy farmers advance their proactive sustainability leadership by enhancing farm bill conservation programs with an emphasis on key dairy areas of opportunity, including feed management. The new investments will provide important voluntary technical assistance to dairy farmers who undertake such stewardship practices, including targeted new funding for dairy farm practices that yield significant environmental benefits.

“Dairy farmers seize environmental sustainability opportunities whenever possible,” says Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of NMPF. “The funding increases in this package will better position dairy farmers to effectively implement the dairy sector’s Net Zero Initiative and fulfill its 2050 environmental stewardship goals. We are very grateful to Chairwoman Stabenow for her success and leadership in securing this meaningful new conservation investment, which will be a game-changer for dairy.”

Dairy farmers in 2020 committed in their Net Zero Initiative to become greenhouse gas neutral or better by 2050 while also maximizing water quality and optimizing water use around the country.

Key wins for dairy among the climate-smart ag provisions of the Inflation Reduction Act include:

• $8.45 billion in new funds for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, which provides technical assistance to dairy farmers, targeted toward stewardship practices that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions;

• $25 million annually for Conservation Innovation Trials, with new funding targeted toward initiatives that use feed and diet management to reduce the enteric methane emissions that can comprise roughly one-third of a dairy farm’s greenhouse gas footprint; and

• $6.75 billion in new funds for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program, which funds locally developed, targeted partnership projects, emphasizing initiatives that incentivize reduced methane emissions.

NMPF and the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives last year led a coalition of 12 agricultural and conservation organizations on a letter advocating for significant new funding for climate-smart agricultural practices while opposing tax policy proposals that could have undermined the transfer of family farms from one generation to the next. NMPF says it is pleased that those tax policy proposals are not included in this legislation and thanks the many members in both parties who advocated against them.

Rob Larew, president of the National Farmers Union (NFU), says NFU welcomes the major investments in voluntary, incentive-based conservation programs for agriculture included in the Inflation Reduction Act.

“These provisions will support farmers and ranchers in continuing to expand their role in fighting climate change while also supporting the resilience of their operations. The addition of biofuels infrastructure funding is also a welcome addition and one that will support farmers and consumers across the country. We strongly support this package and urge Congress to move swiftly and pass it,” Larew says.

However, other groups including the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), National Restaurant Association and Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) have expressed opposition to the bill, with AFBF President Zippy Duvall saying the organization “has serious concerns about the proposed increase in taxes on American businesses at a time when the country is entering a recession.”

Sean Kennedy, executive vice president for public affairs at the National Restaurant Association, notes that for two-and-a-half years, the restaurant industry has taken blow after blow, knocking it down but not out.

“Every month, increasingly powerful blows in the form of higher costs push more and more owners to consider closing their doors. For this reason, the National Restaurant Association cannot support the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 in its current form. This bill provides no relief for restaurants. Instead, it will likely raise prices for our supply chain partners, costs that will eventually pass down to local restaurants,” Kennedy says.

“The Inflation Reduction Act has laudable goals, but the current version is a net negative for local restaurants,” he adds. “Passage of this bill will likely lead to higher supply costs for restaurants already struggling to weather the economic storms. For restaurants hoping for a pandemic lifeline from Washington, this bill falls very short.”

Amid the current economic environment, the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 creates a new $313 billion Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (CAMT). According to the Joint Committee on Taxation, manufacturers and wholesalers will be responsible for paying 59% of the $313 billion, Kennedy says, adding this likely will impact manufacturers and producers of poultry, meat, frozen food, soft drinks and alcohol, as well as their distribution partners, all of whom directly or indirectly provide products to the nation’s restaurants.

“These partners will likely have to pass on many of these costs to restaurant owners,” he says.

Colin Schwartz, deputy director of federal affairs for CSPI, says the Senate missed the opportunity to ensure millions of kids receive healthy school meals. In passing the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, it stripped the bill of an extension of free school meals and additional food assistance for children during the summer.

The bill disappointingly does not include key child nutrition provisions included in the House-passed Build Back Better Act last year, Schwartz says, noting that legislation included $250 million for healthier school meals, expansions of free school meals for 9 million children in higher-poverty schools, additional food assistance through the Summer EBT program for 21 million children and $30 million in kitchen equipment.

The Inflation Reduction Act also does not include an extension of free school meals through next school year, as contained in the bipartisan Support Kids Not Red Tape Act, legislation backed by 51 senators. Schwartz adds.

“These investments in school meals are critical to reduce nutrition and food insecurity and mitigate a hunger cliff that many children may face as they return to school and the meal program lapses,” he says. “We urge Congress to do right by the 30 million children who rely on school meals and add these important investments back into the bill, making sure our kids get the healthy meals they need to learn, grow and thrive.”

CMN


2022 Wisconsin State Fair Blue Ribbon auction raises $45,565

August 12, 2022

BOSTON — Team Crave, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Waterloo, Wisconsin, was named Grand Master Cheesemaker at this week’s Wisconsin State Fair Blue Ribbon Dairy Products Auction, sponsored by the Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Promotion Board. Crave Brothers was honored with the top award for its Chocolate Mascarpone.

At the event, the 46 class winners from the 2022 Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Products Contest, held in June, were auctioned off to the highest bidder. The auction raises funds for student scholarships and dairy promotions at the Wisconsin State Fair.

Nelson-Jameson purchased 2 pounds of the winning Mascarpone for $850 per pound for a total of $1,700. Last night’s auction raised a total of $45,565.

The winning bids for each lot are as follows:

• Lot 1: Flavored Havarti — Emmi Roth purchased 10 pounds of Buholzer Brothers Dill Havarti made by Luke Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $275 per pound for a total of $2,750.

• Lot 2: Mild Cheddar — Masters Gallery Foods purchased 40 pounds of Mild Cheddar made by Andy Kindschy, Associated Milk Producers Inc. (AMPI)-Blair, for $35 per pound for a total of $1,400.

• Lot 3: Swiss Styles — We Energies purchased a 22-pound Swiss Wheel made by Team Deppeler, Chalet Cheese Cooperative, Monroe, for $75 per pound for a total of $1,650.

• Lot 4: Mozzarella — Cheese Market News purchased 13 pounds of Low-Moisture, Whole Milk Mozzarella made by Pat Doell, Agropur, Luxemburg, for $150 per pound for a total of $1,950.

• Lot 5: Open Class for Flavored Yogurt — Ivarson Inc. purchased 4 pounds of Rhubarb Swiss Yogurt made by Yodelay Yogurt, Madison, for $140 per pound for a total of $560.

• Lot 6: String Cheese — Chr. Hansen purchased 2 pounds of Low-Moisture, Part-Skim String Cheese made by Kevin Entringer, Baker Cheese Factory Inc., St. Cloud, for $600 per pound for a total of $1,200.

• Lot 7: Combined Class — Flavored Semi-Soft Cheese and Open Class for Soft & Spreadable Cheese — Oshkosh Cold Storage purchased a combined 9 pounds of Garden Tomato Hand Rubbed Fontal and Cello Mascarpone made by Lake Country Dairy/Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, for $275 per pound for a total of $2,475.

• Lot 8: Brick, Muenster — Nelson-Jameson purchased 10 pounds of Buholzer Brothers Brick made by Tylan Saglum, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $125 per pound for a total of $1,250.

• Lot 9: Combined Class — Drinkable Cultured Products and 2% Fluid Milk-White — David Carpenter of Cedarburg, Wisconsin, purchased a combined 6 pounds of Low Fat Strawberry Kefir and Reduced Fat Milk made by Weber’s Farm Store, Marshfield, for $150 per pound for a total of $900.

• Lot 10: Combined Class — Flavored Pepper Cheese and Flavored Hard Cheese — L&M Corrugated Container Corp. purchased a combined 40 pounds of Salsa Cheddar and Maple Bacon Cheddar made by Team Shullsburg, Jerry Soddy and Donovan Taylor of Prairie Farms Dairy Inc./Shullsburg Creamery, Shullsburg, for $50 per pound for a total of $2,000.

• Lot 11: Reduced Fat or Lite Cheese — Nelson-Jameson purchased 42 pounds of Reduced Fat/Farmers made by Anthony Dew, Cedar Grove Cheese, Plain, for $20 per pound for a total of $840.

• Lot 12: Combined Class — Aged Cheddar and Colby, Monterey Jack — Ivarson Inc. purchased a combined 34 pounds of Deer Creek-The Imperial Buck and Deer Creek-The Robin made by Henning’s Cheese for the Artisan Cheese Exchange, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, for $60 per pound for a total of $2,040.

• Lot 13: Sheep & Mixed Milk Cheese — Dairy Connection purchased 12 pounds of Donatello made by Robert Wills, Cedar Grove Cheese, Plain, for $50 per pound for a total of $600.

• Lot 14: Gouda & Edam — Berenz Packaging purchased 10 pounds of Buholzer Brothers Gouda made by Ron Bechtolt, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $100 per pound for a total of $1,000.

• Lot 15: Combined Class — Salted Butter and Unsalted Butter — Ivarson Inc. purchased a combined 20 pounds of Organic Salted Butter and Organic Unsalted Butter made by CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, LaFarge, for $100 per pound for a total of $2,000.

• Lot 16: Smear Ripened Cheese — Elegant Farmer purchased an 18-pound Roth Grand Cru Original Wheel made by Team Emmi Roth-Monroe, for $25 per pound for a total of $450.

• Lot 17: Combined Class — Flavored Goat Milk Cheese and Natural Goat Milk Cheese — Masters Gallery Foods purchased a combined 4 pounds of LaClare Creamery Chipotle Honey Goat Cheese and LaClare Creamery Original Goat Cheese made by Robert Garves, Mosaic Meadows, Kaukauna, for $175 per pound for a total of $700.

• Lot 18: Pasteurized Process, Cheese Food, Spread — Wisconsin Aging & Grading Cheese purchased 10 pounds of American & Monterey Jack Cheese Loaf made by AMPI’s Dinner Bell Creamery, AMPI, Portage, for $95 per pound for a total of $950.

• Lot 19: Feta — Chr. Hansen purchased 18 pounds of Feta Cheese made by Charles Henn, Agropur, Weyaugwega, for $75 per pound for a total of $1,350.

• Lot 20: Combined Class — Flavored High Protein Yogurt, Unflavored High Protein Yogurt, Open Class Unflavored Yogurt and Low Fat Sour Cream — The Wisconsin State Fair Park Foundation purchased a combined 8 pounds of Odyssey Vanilla Yogurt, Odyssey Traditional PSG Yogurt, Odyssey Whole Fat Yogurt and Odyssey Reduced Fat Greek Tzatziki made by Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $50 per pound for a total of $400.

• Lot 21: Flavored Soft Cheese — Nelson-Jameson purchased 2 pounds of Chocolate Mascarpone made by Team Crave Brothers, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Waterloo, for $850 per pound for a total of $1,700.

• Lot 22: Combined Class — Smoked Cheese and Open Class for Semi-Soft Cheese — Dairyland Packaging purchased a combined 20 pounds of Smoked Provolone and Provolone Cheese made by Roger Krohn, Agropur, Luxemburg, for $125 per pound for a total of $2,500.

• Lot 23: Latin American Cheese — Nelson-Jameson purchased 10 pounds of Chihuahua Cheese made by Team Browntown, V&V Supremo-Chula Vista Cheese, Browntown, for $125 per pound for a total of $1,250.

• Lot 24: Cold Pack Cheese, Cheese Food — Oshkosh Cold Storage purchased 12 pounds of Toasted Onion Cold Pack Cheese Spread made by Team Pine River, Pine River Pre-Pack, Newton, for $175 per pound for a total of $2,100.

• Lot 25: Blue Veined Cheese — Masters Gallery Foods purchased 6 pounds of Deer Creek-The Indigo Bunting made by Carr Valley for The Artisan Cheese Exchange, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, for $425 per pound for a total of $2,550.

• Lot 26: Combined Class — Open Class for Flavored Sour Cream and Open Class for Unflavored Sour Cream — Dairyland Packaging purchased a combined 20 pounds of French Onion Dip and Sour Cream made by Westby Cooperative Creamery, Westby, for $100 per pound for a total of $2,000.

• Lot 27: Combined Class — Unflavored Cheese Curds, Flavored Cheese Curds and Havarti — Masters Gallery Foods purchased a combined 16 pounds of White Curd, Tomato Basil Bacon White Curd and Havarti made by Decatur Cheesemakers, Decatur Dairy, Brodhead, for $175 per pound for a total of $2,800.

• Lot 28: Open Class for Hard Cheese — Nelson-Jameson purchased 20 pounds of Asiago made by Aaron Quick, Sartori Co., Plymouth, for $210 per pound for a total of $4,200.

CMN


V&V Supremo Foods acquires Wisconsin’s Mill Creek Cheese

August 12, 2022

CHICAGO — V&V Supremo Foods Inc., maker of Chihuahua Brand Quesadilla Cheese and an award-winning producer of authentic Mexican cheese, crema and chorizo, this week announced it is capitalizing on continued growth momentum with the acquisition of Arena, Wisconsin-based Mill Creek Cheese.

Mill Creek Cheese, a family-owned cheese plant, has been manufacturing cheese since 1891, making it the oldest operating cheese plant in Iowa County, Wisconsin. V&V Supremo Foods says Mill Creek Cheese customers can expect to continue enjoying high-quality and delicious cheese products under its ownership, noting that V&V Supremo also is a family-owned business with decades of experience delighting customers and distributors alike. The company was founded in 1964 by Mexican natives Gilberto Villaseñor Sr. and Ignacio Villaseñor and now is one of the nation’s oldest family-run Hispanic food businesses, servicing both retail and foodservice industries.

The purchase of the new facility will allow V&V Supremo to increase production to meet the growing demand for its products, strengthening V&V Supremo’s portfolio of offerings for its distributors and their consumers, the company says.

“This acquisition is a very important step in our growth strategy. It will help us meet the growing demand for our products and expand our presence in key markets,” says Gilberto Villaseñor II, chief visionary officer, V&V Supremo Foods Inc.

The company adds that as V&V Supremo Foods continues to grow, it is pleased to offer an expanded product catalog of cheeses and other Mexican specialty grocery products.

Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker John (Randy) Pitman, who owned the plant with his wife Mary for 38 years, will continue to make cheese at the plant, which now will focus on Chihuahua cheese, according to their daughter Amber Wilson. Wilson, the plant’s SQF practitioner, will stay on as well.

“He’s going to be continuing on for at least some time,” Wilson says, adding that “V&V Supremo is a great company, full of great people.”

The acquisition was completed July 29.

CMN



Emmi Roth promotes newly acquired Athenos Feta line, prepares for growth

FITCHBURG, Wis. — Against a backdrop of blue sky, fields of corn and a vintage red barn, leaders, employees and guests of Emmi Roth last week gathered in rural Stoughton, Wisconsin, to commemorate the groundbreaking of its new headquarters and conversion facility. Attendees enjoyed a spread of the company’s most iconic and award-winning cheeses, such as Roth Grand Cru and Emmi AOP Swiss Gruyere, as well as new additions like Roth Hot Honey Gouda and Athenos Feta.

“The facility here will be 158,000 square feet, and its main focus will be conversion. We’re going to be converting Feta, doing portion cutting and also some shredding,” says Emmi Roth Director of Manufacturing Jordan Ehlen. “It will be a lot of our branded items — Athenos Feta, our Roth Havartis, Grand Cru and Goudas.”

Ehlen notes that this new facility will allow Emmi Roth to better leverage its other facilities in Wisconsin by offering internal conversion capacities, allowing the other plants more opportunity for growth. The company still will work with industry partners on specialized conversion of other items.

“The new site will be a complete complement to our current facilities, giving us the ability to convert cheeses into their final forms. This enables us to better meet the needs of our customers and consumers, giving them the forms they desire,” says Tim Omer, president and managing director of Emmi Roth.

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Butter soars, cheese declines in volatile CME spot market

August 5, 2022

By Alyssa Mitchell

MADISON, Wis. — Price volatility abounds across the spot dairy complex, as Cheddar prices on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) this week reached lows not seen since January. Meanwhile, CME butter this week reached $3.06 per pound, its third-highest price on record and a level not seen since 2015.

USDA’s Dairy Market News reports that milk is available for cheese plants in all regions of the country, but most plants are trying to limit production to mute inventory building. Both retail and foodservice cheese demand is weakening as consumers shift spending opposite steep inflation and food cost increases.

While domestic cheese sales likely will remain lower in the coming months, export interest remains firm, USDA adds.

Lucas Fuess, director of dairy market intelligence at HighGround Dairy, Chicago, notes that with concerning economic headwinds and initial evidence that milk production is returning to growth, it is increasingly likely that the price highs of the year have been set in most products, with the exception of butter.

“CME spot cheese values have seen the steepest decline of the key commodities, but further steep drops are not likely,” he says. “While demand concerns abound, there remain end users who will see value at current cheese prices and step in to buy, reducing the chances of additional price downside.”

Fuess adds that prices at this week’s Global Dairy Trade auction mostly aligned with expectations for further price downside.

“Between weaker China purchases and healthy expectations for a return to milk production growth in New Zealand as the season ramps up, buyers are not motivated to pay up to secure product currently,” he says.

Dave Kurzawski, a senior broker with StoneX Group Inc., Chicago, agrees that Chinese demand has been weak and likely is a key driving force for U.S. and global dairy price weakness.

“Prices are still elevated relatively speaking, but they’re falling,” he says, adding that he thinks cheese prices have the potential for further downside before finding some area of stability at a lower price level.

During the second half of the year, the test will be exports, says Sara Dorland, managing partner with Ceres Dairy Risk Management LLC, Seattle.

“So far, demand from Mexico, South Korea and Japan has been favorable for U.S. cheese; however, New Zealand’s June cheese exports to China declined, likely due to the prolonged and widespread lockdowns last spring. Higher costs, supply chain challenges and wary consumers could prove challenging obstacles to overcome to return to higher prices,” she says.

The CME nonfat dry milk (NDM) price also is at a low not seen since last fall, settling at $1.5025 per pound today.
Buyers in the Midwest say they are not getting offers at current prices yet and availability is not necessarily loose, according to USDA.

“Demand is clearly in a slowdown phase, though, as domestic markets are facing some bearish undertones,” USDA adds.

Meanwhile, Fuess says butter demand remains firm opposite tight availability as the calendar quickly moves toward the peak demand season.

“Firm prices are likely to hold in the coming weeks as end users compete for limited supply,” he says.
USDA notes butter plant managers say there has been a notable impact on output due to shorthandedness in staff throughout 2022.

“Butter sales are ticking up as the summer progresses and customers begin to prepare for their fall demand upswings. Some butter contacts expect $3-plus prices to put a damper on buying, but they say potential buying slowdowns in the fall will only push more demand in the winter. All that said, most contacts expect butter markets to maintain some firmness for the near- to mid-term,” USDA says.

As buyers and sellers continue to grapple with price volatility, signs of an impending recession have intensified in recent weeks, Fuess notes.

“Negative GDP growth, stifling inflation, sinking consumer confidence and other concerning signs are troubling for the macroeconomic outlook in the coming quarters. In dairy, it is likely consumers will trade down to cheaper products, away from higher-end restaurants and away from premium grocery items,” he says. “This has mixed impacts in dairy, with some products benefiting while sales in others weaken. Overall though, lower foodservice demand could be a bearish factor that negatively impacts dairy values in the coming months.”
Kurzawski says “recession” is a “four-letter word” for dairy demand, at least historically.

“We may be seeing certain dairy products already impacted by weaker demand in certain socioeconomic enclaves of the U.S.,” he says. “With exorbitant costs of production and persistent supply chain issues, however, I don’t envision a protracted period of dismal dairy prices. Instead, I expect a tremendous amount of price volatility for these markets for the balance of this year.”

Dorland agrees that a recession seems to suggest volatility could be king in 2023.

“Certainly a recession doesn’t bode well for dairy product prices, but there are equal pressures at the farm and processing level, suggesting that there could be swift output reaction to lower prices,” she says.

Dorland adds weather is another wild card for the second half of the year.

“It is having a profound impact on forage, feed crops and output in the United States and Europe,” she says. “While CBOT corn futures dropped mid-July, prices are surging after Russia’s latest bombing of Odessa. The uncertainty and continued inflationary pressures are keeping corn and soybean meal premiums substantial, suggesting dairy producers could face substantially higher feed costs this fall and into next year. Add to that, hot and dry conditions are whittling back yields in some states suggesting not only could dairies pay more for feed, but they may need to buy more feed to supplement less-than-targeted yields.”

CMN


Biden signs legislation to suspend infant formula tariffs amid crisis

August 5, 2022

WASHINGTON — President Biden has signed into law legislation that is aimed to help alleviate the ongoing formula crisis by eliminating tariffs on safe imported baby formula.

The Formula Act was introduced by Reps. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., and Suzan DelBene, D-Wash. It will temporarily suspend tariffs on imported infant formula until Dec. 31.

“Suspending tariffs on the importation of infant formula and relieving parents of steep price increases is a critical step to ending the infant formula shortage,” says Blumenauer, who also is chair of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade. “This crisis requires a whole of government response. The Biden administration has taken important steps to increase supply, and I applaud the FDA’s actions to import more formula. I am thrilled that Congress has moved to temporarily suspend tariff barriers so families across the country can access affordable formula.”

Prior to being signed into law, the legislation passed the House 421-2 and was unanimously agreed to in the Senate.

“The speed at which this legislation moved through Congress underscores the broad bipartisan commitment to helping families get through this crisis, and I thank everyone involved for getting this over the finish line,” DelBene says.

“The law will immediately remove tariffs on safe imported formula and could save families more than 25% at the cash register,” she adds.

In addition to signing this legislation, Biden on Wednesday announced the 19th Operation Fly Formula Mission, where two flights, facilitated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, will transport Danone’s Aptamil Gold Plus Stage 1 infant formula from New Zealand to Chicago on Aug. 8 and 11. These deliveries will include approximately 332,000 pounds of Aptamil Gold Plus Stage 1, the equivalent of 4.3 million 8-ounce bottles. These products will be distributed through top retailers nationwide.

Last month Abbott, which was at the center of the infant formula shortage after its facility in Sturgis, Michigan, was shut down after a recall, announced it will extend rebates it has been offering on competitive formula products until Sept. 30 in states where Abbott holds the contract while Similac is unavailable. Earlier in July, Abbott resumed production at the Sturgis plant and is working to resume full production and distribution of its products.

CMN


June U.S. cheese production up 2.7% from one year earlier

August 5, 2022

WASHINGTON — U.S. cheese production, excluding cottage cheese, in June totaled 1.157 billion pounds, up 2.7% from June 2021’s 1.127 billion pounds, according to data released this week by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Dairy Production chart.) June’s total was down 2.3% from May’s 1.184 billion pounds but up 1.0% on an average daily basis.

Italian-type cheese production in June totaled 484.6 million pounds, up 4.2% from June 2021. Production of Mozzarella, the largest component of Italian-type cheese production, totaled 385.2 million pounds in June, up 5.7% from a year earlier.

American-type cheese production in June totaled 462.0 million pounds, up 1.0% from June 2021. Production of Cheddar, the largest component of American-type cheese, totaled 333.5 million pounds in June, up 1.1% from June 2021.

Wisconsin was the leading cheese-producing state with 290.5 million pounds produced in June, down 0.5% from June 2021. California produced the second most cheese in June at 203.6 million pounds, up 5.1% from a year earlier.

U.S. production of butter totaled 160.5 million pounds in June, up 2.3% from June 2021. June U.S. butter production was down 10.9% from May’s 180.1 million pounds and down 7.9% on an average daily basis. California led the nation in butter production with 54.7 million pounds in June, down 0.8% from June 2021.

CMN


Winners of American Cheese Society’s contest announced

July 29, 2022

PORTLAND, Ore. — The results of the American Cheese Society’s (ACS) 2022 Judging & Competition were announced during a ceremony last week at the “Blazing the Trail for Cheese” ACS conference at the Oregon Convention Center here.

ACS’ Judging & Competition, the largest event of its kind for American-made cheeses, was held in May at the Huntington Bank Stadium at the University of Minnesota. Cheeses in 120 different categories were submitted to be judged by a panel of 30 judges.

On July 21, Best of Show was awarded to Whitney, a Raclette-style cheese made by Jasper Hill Farms of Greensboro Bend, Vermont. Flagsheep from Beecher’s Handmade Cheese of Seattle and Bamboozle of Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Allison Park, Pennsylvania tied for Second Place Best of Show, while Third Place Best of Show went to Greensward, made through a collaboration between Cellars at Jasper Hill and Murray’s Cheese of New York. (See “Jasper Hill’s Whitney named winner of ACS cheese contest” in last week’s issue of Cheese Market News.)

The four “Best of Show” cheeses were among the 380 total awards given at the ceremony — 116 gold medals, 130 silver medals and 133 bronze medals among 136 organizations.

“After a two-year hiatus, we are thrilled that the American Cheese Society’s Judging & Competition (J&C) is back,” says Judging & Competition Chair Rachel Perez. “This year, the 2022 Annual Conference opened with the Award Ceremony to celebrate the accomplishments of our cheesemakers throughout the entire conference. J&C is a unique competition that focuses on providing expert constructive feedback with the goal of giving cheesemakers the guidance to produce better cheese and elevate American Cheese in the marketplace.”

Category award winners in this year’s contest include:

RC: Salted Butter with or without cultures ­— made from cow’s milk

First: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Salted Butter Solid

First: CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, La Farge, Wisconsin, Organic Salted Butter

First: Lactalis Canada, Winchester, Ontario, Lactantia Salted Butter

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, 83% BF Butter Quarters with Sea Salt

Third: Rumiano Cheese Co., Willows, California, Unsalted Butter

Third: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Cultured Butter with Sea Salt

RO: Unsalted Butter with or without cultures — made from cow’s milk

First: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Unsalted Butter

First: Lactalis Canada, Winchester, Ontario, Lactantia Unsalted Butter

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Sierra Nevada Unsalted Cultured Euro-Style Butter

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Unsalted 83% BF Butter Solid

QF: Crème Fraiche and Sour Cream Products — made from cow’s milk

Second: V&V Supremo Foods Inc., Chicago, Mexican Style Sour Cream

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Sour Cream

QK: Drinkable Cultured Products, Kefir, Drinkable Yogurt, Lassi, Buttermilk or other drinkable cultured products — all milks

First: Kalona Organics LLC, Kalona, Iowa, Kalona SuperNatural Organic Whole Plain Kefir

Second: Nasonville Dairy Inc., Marshfield, Wisconsin, Plain Lowfat Kefir

QL: Labneh, Greek Style Yogurt and Other Strained Cultured Products — all milks

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt PSG

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Traditional

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Labne

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Creme Kefir (Creamy Labne)

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey 0% Greek Yogurt

QY: Yogurts — Plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from cow’s milk

Third: Arethusa Farm Dairy, Bantam, Connecticut, Whole Milk Yogurt

QD: Yogurts — Plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from goat’s milk

First: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Probiotic Goat Milk Yogurt Plain

Second: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Original Goat Yogurt

Third: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Capretta Rich & Creamy Goat Yogurt

QX: Yogurts — Plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from sheep, mixed or other milks

First: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Original Sheep Yogurt

Second: Bellwether Farms, Petaluma, California, Sheep Yogurt — Plain

Second: Deca & Otto, Doral, Florida, Deca & Otto Buffalo Milk Yogurt

AD: Cottage Cheese — all milks

Third: Traders Point Creamery, Zionsville, Indiana, Cottage Cheese

Third: WW Homestead Dairy, Waukon, Iowa, WW Homestead Dairy 4% Small Curd Cottage Cheese

AH: Cheese Curds — all milks

First: Cedar Grove Cheese, Plain, Wisconsin, Cheddar Curd

Second: Redhead Creamery, Brooten, Minnesota, Ridiculously Good Cheddar Cheese Curds

Third: Ron’s Wisconsin Cheese, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Ron’s Cheese Curds

AM: Mascarpone and Cream Cheese — made from cow’s milk

First: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Green Bay, Wisconsin, BelGioioso Crema di Mascarpone

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Bella Gento 4/5# Mascarpone

Third: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Waterloo, Wisconsin, Mascarpone

AQ: Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais and Quark — made from cow’s milk

First: Briar Rose Creamery, Dundee, Oregon, Fromage Blanc

Second: Dutch Girl Creamery, Lincoln, Nebraska, Traditional Dutch Kwark

Second: Urban Stead Cheese, Cincinnati, Quark

Third: Calkins Creamery LLC, Honesdale, Pennsylvania, Georgic

AR: Ricotta — made from cow’s milk

First: Calabro Cheese Corp., East Haven, Connecticut, Hand Dipped Ricotta

Second: Maplebrook Farm, North Bennington, Vermont, Ricotta Alta

Third: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 15-ounce Classic Ricotta

AT: Ricotta — made from mixed or other milks

First: Calabro Cheese Corp., East Haven, Connecticut, Ricotta di Bufala

Second: Mozzarella Co., Dallas, Goat Ricotta

Third: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Gris

AX: Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais and Quark — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Briar Rose Creamery, Dundee, Oregon, Brebis

Third: Cypress Grove, Arcata, California, Fromage Blanc

AY: Crescenza and Stracchino style cheeses — all milks

First: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Green Bay, Wisconsin, BelGioioso Crescenza-Stracchino

AC: Open Category — made from Cow’s milk

First: Lioni Latticini Inc, Union, New Jersey, Stracciatella Panna Di Latte

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Gina Marie Farmer Cheese

Third: Ron’s Wisconsin Cheese, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Ron’s Mozzarella Whips

EA: Aged Cheddar — aged 13 months through 23 months — all milks

First: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Extra Sharp Cheddar

Second: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Seattle, Flagship

Second: Pennland Pure, Hancock, Maryland, Sharpsburg Cheddar

Third: Bothwell Cheese, New Bothwell, Manitoba, 548 White Aged Cheddar

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Extra Sharp Cheddar

Third: Tillamook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Extra Sharp Cheddar

EC: Cheddar — aged through 12 months — made from cow’s milk

First: Hoard’s Dairyman Farm Creamery, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, Governors Select, Cheddar made from Guernsey milk

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Extra Sharp Cheddar

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, New York Extra Sharp Cheddar

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Sharp Cheddar

Third: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Fawn

Third: Tillamook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Medium Cheddar

EG: Cheddar — aged through 12 monhts — made from goat’s, sheep’s, buffalo’s, mixed or other milk

First: Central Coast Creamery, Paso Robles, California, Ewereka

Second: Central Coast Creamery, Paso Robles, California, Goat Cheddar

Third: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Capra Bianca

EX: Mature Cheddar — aged 24 months through 47 months — all milks

First: Tillamook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Extra Sharp White Cheddar

Second: Tillamook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Makers Reserve 2019 Cheddar

Third: Rogue Creamery, Central Point, Oregon, Cheese Is Love Cheddar

EE: Mature Cheddar — aged 48 or more months — all milks

First: Lactalis Canada, Winchester, Ontario, Balderson 5 Year Old Cheddar

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, 5 Year Cheddar

Second: Tillamook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Makers Reserve 2017 Cheddar

Third: Lactalis Canada, Winchester, Ontario, Balderson 5 Year Old Cheddar

Third: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Deer Creek 7 Year Proprietor’s Grand Reserve Specialty Cheddar

EW: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen with a natural rind — aged through 12 months — all milks

First: Grafton Village Cheese Co., Grafton, Vermont, Clothbound Cheddar

Second: Urban Stead Cheese, Cincinnati, Street Ched

Third: Fiscalini Farmstead, Modesto, California, Old World Cheddar

EB: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen with a natural rind — aged 13 or more months — all milks

First: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Seattle, Flagship Reserve

Second: Face Rock Creamery, Bandon, Oregon, Face 2 Face Clothbound Cheddar

Second: Redhead Creamery, Brooten, Minnesota, Lucky Linda Clothbound Cheddar

Third: Face Rock Creamery, Bandon, Oregon, Clothbound Cheddar

EF: Sweet Cheddar — commoly made by including Lb. helveticus adjunct culture — all milks, all ages

First: Face Rock Creamery, Bandon, Oregon, Face 2 Face Mixed Milk Cheddar

Second: Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Algoma, Wisconsin, New World Cheddar

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, White Oak Cheddar

Third: Saputo Cheese USA Inc./Saputo Dairy Foods USA LLC, Dallas, Black Creek Cheddar Parmesan

FC: Rindless Blue-veined — made from cow’s milk

First: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Blue Paradise Cheese

Second: Prairie Farms Dairy Inc. - Cheese Division, Mindoro, Wisconsin, Prairie Farms - Mindoro Collection: Blue Cheese Wheel (Pasteurized)

Third: Kingston Creamery, Cambria, Wisconsin, Kingston Organic Blue Cheese

FX: Rindless Blue-veined — made from goat, sheep, mixed or other milks

Second: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Boujee Bleu

Third: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Ewe’s Bleu

FK: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from cow’s milk

First: Sequatchie Cove Creamery, Sequatchie, Tennessee, Shakerag Blue

Second: Caves of Faribault -Prairie Farms Dairy, Faribault, Minnesota, Felix Blue Cheese

Third: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Point Reyes Station, California, Point Reyes Bay Blue

FZ: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from goat, sheep, mixed or other milks

First: Lively Run Dairy, Interlaken, New York, CayugaBlue

Second: Pennyroyal Farm, Boonville, California, Boonter’s Blue

FE: External Blue-molded/rinded cheeses — all milks

Third: Westfield Farm, Hubbardston, Massachusetts, Classic Blue Log

BB: Brie — made from cow’s milk

First: Little Island Creamery, Cathlamet, Washington, Brie

Second: Alemar Cheese Co., Minneapolis, Blue Earth Brie

Third: Lactalis American Group, New York, Président 1-kilogram Brie Wheel

BC: Camembert — made from cow’s milk

Second: Old Europe Cheese, Benton Harbor, Michigan, 8-ounce Camembert Traditionnel

Third: Sweet Grass Dairy, Thomasville, Georgia, Green Hill

BT: Triple Crème — soft ripened/cream added — all milks

First: Tulip Tree Creamery LLC, Indianapolis, Trillium

Second: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Sherry Gray

Third: Arethusa Farm Dairy, Bantam, Connecticut, Karlie’s Gratitude

BA: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Nicasio Valley Cheese Co., Nicasio, California, Formagella

Second: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, St. Albans

Third: Savencia Cheese USA, New Holland, Pennsylvania, Dorothy Comeback Cow

BG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Longmont, Colorado, Haystack Peak

Second: Baetje Farms, Bloomsdale, Missouri, Bloomsdale

Third: Blakesville Creamery, Port Washington, Wisconsin, Lake Effect

Third: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Longmont, Colorado, Snowdrop

BS: Open Category- made from sheep’s milk

First: Briar Rose Creamery, Dundee, Oregon, Agness

Second: The Farm at Doe Run, Coatesville, Pennsylvania, Willow

Third: Blackberry Farm, Walland, Tennessee, Hawkins Haze

BX: Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Boxcarr Handmade Cheese, Cedar Grove, North Carolina, Cottonseed

Third: Rivers Edge Chevre LLC, Logsden, Oregon, Beltane

GA: Ripened, Aged over 90 days (Anejo, Cincho, Cotija, Flamingo Bolla, Prato) — all milks

First: Rizo Lopez Foods, Inc., Modesto, California, Tio Francisco Queso Cotija

Second: Rizo Lopez Foods, Inc., Modesto, California, Rizo Bros Cotija Cheese

Third: Daniel’s Artisan, Ferndale, Washington, Queso Cotija

Third: StuytDairy Farmstead Cheese Co. LLC, Escalon, California, El Capitan

GC: Fresh, Unripened (Acoreano, Freir, Queijo Blanco, Queso Andinao, Queso Blanco, Queso Campesino, Queso Crema, Queso de Puna, Queso Fresco) — all milks

First: V&V Supremo Foods, Inc., Chicago, Queso Fresco

Second: Rizo Lopez Foods, Inc., Modesto, California, Rizo Bros Fresco Cheese

Third: Don Froylan Creamery, Salem, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Fresco

GM: Cooking Hispanic — Cheeses intended to be consumed heated or melted (Chihuahua, Para Freir, Quesadilla, Quesillo, etc.) — all milks

First: Don Froylan Creamery, Salem, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Oaxaca

Second: V&V Supremo Foods, Inc., Chicago, Chihuahua Cheese

Third: Daniel’s Artisan, Ferndale, Washington, Oaxaca

HY: Fresh Mozzarella — 8-ounces or more (Balls or Shapes) — all milks

First: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Waterloo, Wisconsin, Fresh Mozzarella

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 16-ounce Fresh Mozzarella Log

Third: BUF Creamery LLC, Charlottesville, Virginia, BUF Ovoline

Third: Liuzzi Cheese, North Haven, Connecticut, 8-ounce Fresh Ovoline Mozzarella

HZ: Fresh Mozzarella — under 8 ounces (Ovalini, Bocconcini, Ciliegine sizes) — all milk

First: Caputo Cheese, Melrose Park, Illinois, Mini-Nodini

Second: Caputo Cheese, Melrose Park, Illinois, Nodini

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 8-ounce Pearl Thermoform Ball

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 8-ounce Ovoline Cup

Second: Liuzzi Cheese, North Haven, Connecticut, 8-ounce Nodini Mozzarella

Third: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 8-ounce Pearls Cup

HB: Burrata — Fresh Mozzarella encasing a distinctly separate core made form softer curd and cream or other soft cheese — all milks

First: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Green Bay, Wisconsin, BelGioioso Burrata

First: Caputo Cheese, Melrose Park, Illinois, Burratini

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Burrata 8 ounce

Second: Maplebrook Farm, North Bennington, Vermont, Handmade Burrata

Third: Caputo Cheese, Melrose Park, Illinois, Burrata

Third: Liuzzi Cheese, North Haven, Connecticut, Burrata

Third: Quality Cheese Inc., Vaughan, Ontario, Bella Casara Burrata 250 gram

HM: Mozzarella types (Brick, Scamorza, String Cheese) — all milks

First: Ron’s Wisconsin Cheese, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Ron’s Mozzarella String Cheese

Second: Don Froylan Creamery, Salem, Oregon, Liliana’s String Cheese

Third: Lidl, Arlington, Virginia, Mozzarella String Cheese

HP: Pasta Filata types (Provolone, Caciocavallo) — all milks

First: Ferndale Farmstead, Ferndale, Washington, Provolone

Second: Pennland Pure, Hancock, Maryland, Pennland Pure Provolone

Third: Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani 6-pound Provolone

HD: Traditional Regional Italian Cheeses (including but not limited to: Mezzo Secco, Asiago Piccante and Fresca, Piave, Montasio, Caciotta, Bra, Ragusano, Fontina, Fontal, Toma, Robiola Natural Rind, etc.) — all milks

First: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Fontal

Second: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Asiago

Third: Ferndale Farmstead, Ferndale, Washington, Fontina

HA: Grating types (Aged Asiago, Domestic Parmesan, Grana, Reggianito, Romano, Sardo) — all milks

Second: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Green Bay, Wisconsin, BelGioioso American Grana

Third: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Organic Copper Kettle Parmesan

IC: Feta — made from cow’s milk

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Feta

Second: Maplebrook Farm, North Bennington, Vermont, Whole Milk Feta

Third: Samish Bay Cheese, Bow, Washington, Feta Cheese

IG: Feta — made from goat’s milk

First: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, Feta

First: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Bella Capra Goat Feta

IX: Feta — made from sheep, mixed or other milks

First: Briar Rose Creamery, Dundee, Oregon, Milk Feta

Second: Harmony Fields, Bow, Washington, Fleecemaker

Third: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Feta

DB: Cheeses wrapped in bark, leaves or grass

First: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Harbison

Second: FireFly Farms, Accident, Maryland, Merry Goat Round-Spruce Reserve

Second: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Point Reyes Station, California, Point Reyes Quinta

Third: Brush Creek Creamery, Deary, Idaho, Mountain Maple Brie

Third: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Winnimere

DD: Dutch-style (Gouda, Edam, etc.) — all milks

First: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Longmont, Colorado, Maroon Bells Gouda

Second: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Belegen

Third: Arethusa Farm Dairy, Bantam, Connecticut, Europa

Third: Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Allison Park, Pennsylvania, More Cowbell

Third: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Young

DE: Emmental-style with Eye Formation (Swiss, Baby Swiss, Blocks, Wheels, etc.) — made from cow’s milk

First: Guggisberg Cheese, Millersburg, Ohio, Baby Swiss Cheese

Second: Prairie Farms, Shullsburg, Wisconsin, Baby Swiss Wheel

Third: Prairie Farms, Luana, Iowa, Swiss Cheese

DC: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Alpha Tolman

First: Saxon Creamery, Malone, Wisconsin, Saxony Alpine Style

Second: Cherry Grove Farm, Lawrence, New Jersey, Havilah

Second: Leelanau Cheese Company, Suttons Bay, Michigan, Leelanau Raclette

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Havarti

DG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Asgaard Farm & Dairy, Au Sable Forks, New York, Gladsheim

Second: Crown Finish Caves, Brooklyn, New York, Carpenter’s Wheel

Third: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Bijou

DS: Open Category — made from sheep’s milk

First: Landmark Creamery LLC, Belleville, Wisconsin, Pecora Nocciola

DX: Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Ruby

Third: Sartori Co., Plymouth, Wisconsin, Sartori Pastorale Blend

JL: Fat Free and Lowfat cheeses

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Low Fat Feta

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Fat Free Feta

JR: Light/Lite and Reduced Fat cheeses

Second: Prairie Farms, Luana, Iowa, Neufchatel

Third: Fromagerie Bergeron, St. Antoine-de-Tilly, Quebec, Seigneur de Tilly 18 mois

LM: Smoked Italian Styles (Mozzarella, Scamorza, Bocconcini, Ovalini, etc.) — all milks

Third: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked Mozzarella

Third: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Double Smoked Mozzarella

LD: Smoked Cheddars — all milks

First: Tillamoook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Hickory Smoked Cheddar

Second: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked White Cheddar

Third: Tillamoook, Tillamook, Oregon, Tillamook Hickory Smoked Extra Sharp White Cheddar

LC: Open Category — Smoked Cheeses — made from cow’s milk

First: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked Pepper Jack

First: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Double Smoked Natural Gruyere

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., East Haven, Connecticut, Smoked Burrata

Third: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked Colby Jack

Third: Rogue Creamery, Central Point, Oregon, Smokey Blue

LG: Gouda — Smoked Cheeses — made from all milks

First: Global Foods International Inc., Schiller Park, Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked Creamy Gouda

Second: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Smoked Cumin

Third: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Benton Harbor, Michigan, Naturally Smoked Gouda Cheese

LX: Open Category — Smoked Cheeses — made from mixed or other milks

First: Rivers Edge Chevre LLC, Logsden, Oregon, Up in Smoke

Second: Goat Lady Dairy, Climax, North Carolina, Smokey Mountain Round

Third: Cedar Grove Cheese, Plain, Wisconsin, Smoked Ricotta Fresca di Capra

NO: Fresh Rindless Goat’s MIlk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 Days

First: Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery LLC, Champaign, Illinois, Chrvre Frais

Second: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, Chevre

Third: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Classic Goat Cheese Log

NS: Fresh Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 Days

Second: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, Silver Lining

Third: Blakesville Creamery, Port Washington, Wisconsin, Fresh Chevre

NU: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 Days

First: Blakesville Creamery, Port Washington, Wisconsin, St. Germain

Second: Lively Run Dairy, Interlaken, New York, Finger Lakes Gold Reserve

Third: Dutch Girl Creamery, Lincoln, Nebraska, Rosa Maria

OO: Fresh Rindless Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 Days

First: Original, Bellwether Farms, Petaluma, California, Fresh Sheep Cheese Log

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Fresh Plain

Third: Blackberry Farm, Walland, Tennessee, Brebis

OT: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 Days

First: Landmark Creamery, LLC, Belleville, Wisconsin, Pomona

Second: Murray’s Cheese, Long Island City, New York, Buttermilk Basque

Third: Harmony Fields, Bow, Washington, La Bertha

OU: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 Days

First: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Prairie Tomme

Second: Hidden Springs Creamery, Westby, Wisconsin, Wischago Reserve

Third: Shooting Star Creamery, Paso Robles, California, Aries

KR: Butter with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Cherry Valley Dairy, Duvall, Washington, Herbed Rose Butter

Third: Cherry Valley Dairy, Duvall, Washington, Coffee Butter

KQ: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (set yogurts, Greek-style, dips, etc.) — cow’s milk

First: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Triple Cream Vanilla Bean Greek Yogurt

Second: Arethusa Farm Dairy, Bantam, Connecticut, Maple Yogurt

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe,Wisconsin, Odyssey Vanilla Greek Yogurt

Second: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Vanilla Crème Fraîche

Third: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Organic Jersey’s cow milk Meyer Lemon Yogurt

Third: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Cilantro & Lime Sour Crème

Third: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Fire-Roasted Onion & Chive Sour Crème

KV: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (drinkable, pourable, smoothie, etc.) — all milks

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc, Hanford, California, El Mexicano Yogurt-Pina Colada

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc, Hanford, California, El Mexicano Yogurt-Strawberry

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc, Hanford, California, El Mexicano Yogurt-Strawberry/Banana

Second: Nasonville Dairy, Inc., Marshfield, Wisconsin, Mango Lowfat Kefir

Third: Nasonville Dairy, Inc., Marshfield, Wisconsin, Strawberry Lowfat Kefir

KT: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (set yogurts, Greek-style, dips, etc.) — all mixed and other milks

First: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Ginger Sheep Yogurt

Third: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Probiotic Goat Milk Yogurt Vanilla

KE: Cheddar with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Seattle, Marco Polo Reserve

First: Face Rock Creamery, Bandon, Oregon, Peppercorn Harvest Clothbound Cheddar

Third: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Doe

KH: Cheddar with Hot Flavor Added — all milks

First: Beehive Cheese Co. LLC, Uintah, Utah, Red Butte Hatch Chile

Second: Face Rock Creamery, Bandon, Oregon, In Your Face Spicy 3 Pepper Cheddar

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars, Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Jalapeno Cheddar Cheese

KA: Fresh Unripened Cheese with Flavor Added (Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Impastata, Quark, etc.) — cow, sheep, mixed and other milks

First: Traders Point Creamery, Zionsville, Indiana, Spicy Fromage Blanc

Second: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC., Waterloo, Wisconsin, Chocolate Mascarpone

Third: Savencia Cheese USA, New Holland, Pennsylvania, Alouette Garlic & Herb Spreadable Cheese

KL: Cheese Curds with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Ellsworth, Wisconsin, Natural Ranch Cheese Curds

Second: CheeseSmith Artisan Creamery, San Diego, California, Lime and Chili Cheese Curds

Third: Prairie Farms Dairy Inc., Davenport, Iowa, Prairie Farms Shullsburg Creamery’s Jalapeno Cheese Curds

KB: Soft-Ripened with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Murray’s Cheese, Long Island City, New York, Hudson Flower

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Président 3-kilogram Brie w/Herbs Whole Wheel

Second: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Benton Harbor, Michigan, 3-kilogram Double Creme with Herb and Garlic

Third: Nettle Meadow, Warrensburg, New York, Nettle Meadow Sappy Ewe

KG: Hispanic-Style with Flavor Added — all milks

First: V&V Supremo Foods Inc., Chicago, Chihuahua Cheese with Jalapeno Peppers

Second: Mozzarella Co., Dallas, Menonina Jalapeño

Third: Mozzarella Co., Dallas, Dolce Habanero

KI: Feta with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Peppercorn Feta

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Tomato & Basil Feta

Third: Appel Farms,Ferndale, Washington, Basil Tomato Feta

KD: International-Style with Flavor Added — all milks

Second: Zingerman’s Creamery, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Cervelle de Canut

Third: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Jalapeno

KJ: Reduced Fat Cheese with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Algoma, Wisconsin, Farmers Cheese with Pesto

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Mediterranean Feta

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Tomato & Basil Feta

KN: Fresh Goat Cheese with sweet predominant flavor — aged under 30 days — 100% goat’s milks

First: Vermont Creamery, Websterville, Vermont, Clover Blossom Honey Goat Cheese Log

Second: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, June’s Joy

Third: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Pastures Spreadable Honey and Lavender

KP: Fresh Goat Cheese with savory predominant flavor — aged underk 30 days — 100% goat’s milk

First: Mozzarella Co., Dallas, Goat Piece Hoja Santa
Second: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, Herbes de Provence

Third: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Pastures Garlic and Herb

Third: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Pastures Fennel Pollen

KO: Sheep Cheese with Flavor Added — 100% sheep’s milk

First: Bellwether Farms, Petaluma, California, Fresh Sheep Sheep Log-Sonoma Herb

First: Blackberry Farm, Walland, Tennessee, Ramp Brebis

Second: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Hook’s Sheep Milk Truffle

Third: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Nettle Fresh

Third: Hidden Springs Creamery, Westby, Wisconsin, Driftless Cranberry

KF: Farmstead Cheese with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Balfour Farm LLC, Pittsfield, Maine, Smokey Ghost Cheddar

First: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Pastures Honey and Lavender

First: Pennyroyal Farm, Boonville, California, Fratty Corners

Second: Balfour Farm LLC, Pittsfield, Maine, Garlic & Herb Bevre

Third: Daniel’s Artisan, Ferndale, Washington, Fuego

KK: Rubbed-Rind Cheese with added flavor ingredients rubbed or applied on the exterior surface of the cheese only

First: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Smoky Pepper Rubbed Fontal

Second: Sartori Co., Plymouth, Wisconsin, Sartori Rosemary Asiago

Second: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Mayan Cocoa Coffee Rubbed Fontal

Second: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Creamy Dill Rubbed Fontal

Third: Beehive Cheese Co., LLC, Uintah, Utah, Barely Buzzed

Third: Schuman Cheese, Fairfield, New Jersey, Cello Pumpkin Spice Rubbed Fontal

KM: American Originals with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Point Reyes Station, California, Point Reyes TomaRashi

Second: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Point Reyes Station, California, Point Reyes TomaProvence

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese with Caraway

KS: Cold-Pack and Club Cheeses with Flavor Added

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Green Olive Aged Brick Spread

Second: Pine River Prepack, Newton, Wisconsin, Pepper Jack Cold Pack Cheese Spread

Third: Pine River Prepack, Newton, Wisconsin, Swiss and Almond Cold Pack Cheese Spread

KC: Open Category — Cheeses with Flavor Added — all milks and mixed milks

First: Pineland Farms Dairy Co., Bangor, Maine, Aged Cheddar

Second: Prairie Farms Dairy Inc., Davenport, Iowa, Prairie Farms ShullsburgCreamery Jack n Dill

Second: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Deer Creek the Blue Jay

Third: Calabro Cheese Corp., East Haven, Connecticut, Burrata con Tartufo

Third: Prairie Farms Inc, Davenport, Iowa, Prairie Farms Shullsburg Creamery Cranberry Chipotle Cheddar

PC: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients — made from cow’s milk

First: Brush Creek Creamery, Deary, Idaho, Marinated Labneh

Second: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Waterloo, Wisconsin, Marinated Fresh Mozzarella

Third: Sartori Co., Plymouth, Wisconsin, Sartori Chardonnay BellaVitano

PX: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients — made from mixed or other milks

First: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Marinated Goat Cheese Black Truffle

Second: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Marinated Goat Cheese Thyme & Rosemary

Second: Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, Chatham’s Trifecta

Third: Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, Marinated Goat Cheese Jalapeno Chili

SC: Open Category — Cold-Pack and Club Cheeses — all milks

First: Lactalis Canada, Winchester, Ontario, Aged Balderson Spread

Second: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars, Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Jalapeno Aged Brick Spread

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars, Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Aged Brick Spread

TB: Soft-Ripened Washed Rind

First: Murray’s Cheese, Long Island City, New York, Greensward

Second: Marin French Cheese, Sonoma, California, Golden Gate

Second: Murray’s Cheese, Long Island City, New York, 80.10.10

Third: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Willoughby

Third: Churchtown Dairy, Hudson, New York, Coperthwaite

Third: The Farm at Doe Run, Coatesville, Pennsylvania, English Cream

TR: Raclette-style — aged over 5 days

First: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Whitney

First: Spring Brook Farm Cheese LLC, Reading, Vermont, The Full Ver-monty

Second: Fantello Farmstead Creamery, Enumclaw, Washington, Filomena

Second: Roelli Cheese Co. with Crown Finish Caves, Shullsburg, Wisconsin, Tree Line Raclette

Third: Spring Brook Farm Cheese LLC, Reading, Vermont, Reading

TC: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses — made from cow’s milk

First: Uplands Cheese, Dodgeville, Wisconsin, Pleasant Ridge Reserve

Second: Emmi Roth, Fitchburg, Wisconsin, Roth Grand Cru Surchoix

Second: Roelli Cheese Co. with Crown Finish Caves, Shullsburg, Wisconsin, Crown Jewel

Third: Cowgirl Creamery, Petaluma, California, Hop Along

TG: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses — made form goat’s milk

First: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyll Tempation

Second: Blakesville Creamery, Port Washington, Wisconsin, Sunny Ridge

Second: Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Stowe, Vermont, Lightning Knoll

Third: FireFly Farms Inc., Accident, Maryland, Cabra la Mancha

TS: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses — made from sheep’s milk

First: Grafton Village Cheese Co., Grafton, Vermont, Bear Hill

Second: Landmark Creamery LLC, Belleville, Wisconsin, Anabasque

Third: Landmark Creamery LLC, Belleville, Wisconsin, Rebel Miel

TX: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses — made from mixed or other milks

First: Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Allison Park, Pennsylvania, Bamboozle

Second: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, Eligo

MA: Farmstead Category — aged less than 60 days — all milks

First: Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery LLC, Champaign, Illinois, Fleur de la Prairie

First: Rivers Edge Chevre LLC, Logsden, Oregon, Siltcoos

First: Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Stowe, Vermont, Snowball

Second: Blakesville Creamery, Port Washington, Wisconsin, Lake Breeze

Third: Pure Luck, Dripping Springs, Texas, Basket Chevre

MC: Farmstead Category — aged 60 days or more — 39% or higher moisture — made from cow’s milk

First: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Point Reyes Station, California, Point Reyes California Coastal Blue

Second: Pleasant Lane Farms Creamery LLC, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, 1976 Reserve Farmstead Gouda

Third: Fiscalini Farmstead, Modesto, California, Lionza

Third: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Mature

ME: Farmstead Category — aged 60 days or more — less than 39% moisture — made from cow’s milk

First: Cherry Grove Farm, Lawrence, New Jersey, Havilah Reserve

First: arieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Super

Second: arieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Premium

Third: Redhead Creamery, Brooten, Minnesota, Margie

MG: Farmstead Category — aged 60 days or more — made from goat’s milk

First: Stepladder Creamery, Cambria, California, Farmstead Clothbound Goat Cheddar

Second: Asgaard Farm & Dairy, Au Sable Forks, New York, Au Sable Valley Tomme

Second: Pennyroyal Farm, Boonville, California, Boont Corners Reserve

Third: Boxcarr Handmade Cheese, Cedar Grove, North Carolina, Pondersome

MS: Farmstead Category — aged 60 days or more — made crom sheep’s milk

First: Shepherd’s Way Farms, Nerstrand, Minnesota, Sogn

MX: Farmstead Category — aged 60 days or more — made from mixed or other milks

First: Pennyroyal Farm, Boonville, California, Boont Corners 2 Month

Second: The Farm at Doe Run, Coatesville, Pennsylvania, Runnymede

Third: The Farm at Doe Run, Coatesville, Pennsylvania, Black Swallowtail

CB: Brick Cheese — made from cow’s milk

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars, Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, Wisconsin, Brick

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Theresa, Wisconsin, Mild Brick Cheese

CD: Dry Jack — made form cow’s milk

Second: Rumiano Cheese Co., Willows, California, Dry Jack

CJ: Monterey Jack — made from cow’s milk

First: Arena Cheese, Arena, Wisconsin, Colby Jack Deli

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., Willows, California, Sierra Nevada Organic Jack

Third: Pennland Pure, Hancock, Maryland, Pennland Pure Monterey Jack

CM: Brick Muenster — made from cow’s milk

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe , Wisconsin, Muenster

Second: CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, La Farge, Wisconsin, Organic Muenster Cheese

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Waitsfield, Vermont, Muenster

CY: Colby — made from cow’s milk

First: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Deer Creek the Robin

Second: Arena Cheese, Arena, Wisconsin, Traditional Colby Deli

Third: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Colby

CC: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Red Barn Family Farms, Appleton, Wisconsin, Vintage Cupola Artisan Cheese

Second: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Golden Creamy

Third: Marieke Gouda, Thorp, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Young

CG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Goat Lady Dairy, Climax, North Carolina, Providence

First: Lively Run Dairy, Interlaken, New York, Finger Lakes Gold

Second: Idyll Farms, Northport, Michigan, Idyllweiss

Third: LaClare Family Creamery, Malone, Wisconsin, Evalon

CS: Open Category — made from sheep’s milk

First: Green Dirt Farm, Weston, Missouri, Dirt Lover

First: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Seattle, Flagsheep

CX: Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Cedar Grove Cheese, Plain, Wisconsin, Montague

Third: Central Coast Creamery, Paso Robles, California, Seascape.

CMN


Dairy stakeholders commend passage of child nutrition bill

July 29, 2022

WASHINGTON — The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) this week praised the House Education and Labor Committee’s passage of the Healthy Meals, Healthy Kids Act, a bill that reauthorizes federal child nutrition programs.

“Dairy farmers and processors across the nation pride themselves on providing nutritious, healthful foods, say NMPF and IDFA in a joint statement, noting milk provides 13 essential vitamins and nutrients, including three of the four deemed to be of public health concern.

Milk also is the top source of calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and vitamin D in kids ages 2-18, the groups note. The most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans highlight the robust nutrient package milk provides and note that school-aged children do not consume recommended amounts of dairy foods.

“Ensuring children and adolescents have access to nutrient-dense milk and healthful dairy foods is a top priority for NMPF, IDFA and our members,” the groups say. “Child nutrition programs are critical to ensuring kids have access to nutritious food. We thank those across our nation who work hard every day to administer these vital programs. The Healthy Meals, Healthy Kids Act approved (this week) by the House Education and Labor Committee includes provisions to provide increased access and maintain existing access to healthful dairy foods.”

In addition to expanding eligibility and increasing support to schools, the bill takes an important step in increasing students’ access to nutritious food by securing more permanently the ability for schools to serve all milk options consistent with the Dietary Guidelines.

“We thank Rep. Joe Courtney, D-Conn., who has championed the issue for years with his School Milk Nutrition Act, for his leadership in securing these healthy milk options for schools,” NMPF and IDFA say. “Milk consumption increases when more varieties are available; protecting the ability for schools to choose the milk options that best serve their students is crucial. Increased milk consumption means more intake of milk’s essential nutrients. And schools that have seen a rise in milk consumption have, in many cases, seen overall school-meals participation rise as well.”

They note the legislation also points to the importance of the nutrients milk provides for students. The Healthy Meals, Healthy Kids Act maintains the requirement that milk substitutes be nutritionally equivalent to real milk unless the student is being offered a substitute for medical or other diet-related needs.

“We will continue our efforts to further strengthen nutritional equivalency requirements to protect access to milk’s essential nutrients in child nutrition programs,” NMPF and IDFA say.

CMN


Dairy farmers voice need for risk management in farm bill

July 29, 2022

WASHINGTON — The House Agriculture Committee on Monday held the fourth in a series of listening sessions entitled “A 2022 Review of the Farm Bill: Perspectives from the Field” at Far-Gaze Farms in Northfield, Minnesota.

Two members of Congress participated with approximately 130 members of the public participating in person and more than 1,000 streaming online. Audience members discussed topics including crop insurance, dairy policy, new and underrepresented farmers, and mental health.

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) commended farmers from member cooperatives who spoke up for dairy’s needs at the sessions.

“From sustainability and trade to providing an adequate safety net to producers of all sizes, dairy farmer voices are critical to crafting federal farm programs that serve the entire nation,” says Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of NMPF. “We commend the farmers who own our member cooperatives for sharing their insights. We also thank Congress for making sure that dairy is heard as the next farm bill begins taking shape.”

The session in Minnesota followed an event in Washington state last week. Both are part of a series of sessions being held to prepare for the 2023 Farm Bill.

Farm bill safety net and risk management programs are critical to the economic viability of American dairy producers, farmers told members of the House Agriculture Committee during the sessions. Farmers representing NMPF member cooperatives Associated Milk Producers Inc. (AMPI), Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and Northwest Dairy Association (NDA) shared their perspectives on the upcoming farm bill during the events hosted by Rep. Angie Craig, D-Minn., and Rep. Kim Schrier, D-Wash.

During this week’s listening session, Steve Schlangen, chairman of AMPI and an NMPF executive committee member, emphasized the value of the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program. Created in the 2018 Farm Bill at NMPF’s urging, DMC is designed to ensure that dairy farmers can protect themselves against financial catastrophe and market fluctuations.

Schlangen urged the committee to strengthen the program by carrying the Supplemental Dairy Margin Coverage update over into the next farm bill to compensate farmers for modest increases in production since the program formula was created in 2014. He was joined by Charles Krause, a DFA farmer from Buffalo, Minnesota, and KC Graner, a Land O’Lakes ag retail member-owner from Truman, Minnesota, who among other topics supported the Dairy Donation Program to connect dairy products to food-insecure families and additional funding and policies to encourage and scale climate-smart ag practices.

At last week’s listening session in Carnation, Washington, dairy farmers and NDA member-owners Jeremy Visser and Jim Werkhoven in their remarks urged committee members to ensure that risk management tools work effectively for farmers of all sizes and to provide robust funding for trade promotion programs like the Market Access Program.

CMN


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Today's Cheese Spot Trading
August 18, 2022


Barrels: $1.9475 (NC)
Blocks: $1.8775 (NC)


Click here for more market activity
Cheese Production
U.S. Total June
1.157 bil. lbs.


Milk Production
U.S. Total June
18.975 bil. lbs.

Guest Columnist

A mixed bag of economic factors

Ty Rohloff, with Compeer Financial

Farmer-processor relationship must underpin milk pricing reform

Tim Trotter, Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative

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