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Industry navigates vaccine updates, restaurant outlook

October 22, 2021

WASHINGTON — On Oct. 12, U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sent its emergency temporary standard (ETS) to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget to implement a rule that would mandate large employers to either require COVID-19 vaccinations or regular testing among their employees. The White House currently is in the review process, and details of the ETS have not yet been made public.

On Sept. 9, President Biden announced the U.S. Department of Labor was developing the emergency rule to require all employers with 100 or more employees to ensure their workforces are fully vaccinated or show a negative test at least once a week. OSHA, which drafted the ETS, has said the rule will carry penalties of $14,000 per violation.

Dairy industry groups have been updating guidances for employers regarding COVID-19 vaccinations and testing. Guidance from the International Dairy Foods Association is available at www.idfa.org/news/coronavirus#guidance, and guidance from the National Milk Producers Federation is at www.nmpf.org/covid-19-delta-variant-what-dairy-employers-need-to-know. While awaiting more details to comment on the pending mandate, both groups told Cheese Market News that they encourage vaccinations among the cheese and dairy industry (see “Dairy industry reacts to federal mandate on vaccines, testing” in the Sept. 17, 2021, issue of Cheese Market News).

In other vaccine news, FDA this week took action to expand the use of a booster dose for COVID-19 vaccines in eligible populations. The agency is amending the emergency use authorizations (EUA) for COVID-19 vaccines to allow for the use of a single booster dose of the Moderna vaccine in older or at-risk individuals, and of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to anyone 18 years or older. The Pfizer vaccine booster already had been approved for certain individuals. FDA also this week authorized the use of a “mix and match” booster dose for currently available COVID-19 vaccines. For more information on these vaccines and updates, visit www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/covid-19-vaccines.

Meanwhile, as restaurants continue to face COVID-related challenges, the National Restaurant Association this week sent a letter to the U.S. Conference of Mayors warning that thousands of restaurants could close without support to extend outdoor dining.

The letter warns that despite a few weeks of optimism earlier this summer, the outlook for the restaurant industry remains dire. The delta variant caused a majority of consumers to change their restaurant use, including 20% who have chosen to sit outside instead of inside. In recent weeks, the delta variant slowed indoor dining at 78% of restaurants, the association says.

Additionally, while numerous operators benefited from the federal Restaurant Revitalization Fund (RRF), it quickly ran out of money, and approximately two-thirds of applicants did not receive any funding. Congress has yet to replenish the fund, leaving a $43.6 billion funding gap and 177,000 restaurants in danger of closing, the National Restaurant Association says.

“Restaurants currently rely on outdoor dining to stay open, but the dark chill of winter is coming,” says Mike Whatley, vice president for state affairs and grassroots advocacy, National Restaurant Association. “For operators depending on this revenue, every additional day they can extend their outdoor service matters. Last year, despite supply chain issues, many restaurants were able to invest in equipment to expand and winterize their outdoor dining areas. But many restaurants weren’t able to make those investments.”

The letter encourages local leaders to do everything in their power to assist restaurants in offering outdoor dining for as long as possible this winter. Specifically, it suggests extending expanded outdoor dining allowances, continuing to streamline permitting processes, promoting outdoor dining efforts by operators in their localities and providing funding for outdoor dining infrastructure as some localities did last year.

“Expanded outdoor dining cannot replace robust consumer demand for indoor dining or Congress taking action to replenish the RRF, yet it is critically needed to help the industry sustain the winter,” Whatley says.

CMN


U.S., Mexico commit to keeping markets open for trade in talks

October 22, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Mexican Secretary of Agriculture and Rural Development Victor Villalobos met in Ames, Iowa, this week for bilateral discussions.

“We reaffirm the importance of our two nations’ exceptional agricultural trading relationship and its role in supporting rural prosperity, creating good jobs and providing nutritious, safe and affordable food to consumers in both countries. Thanks to the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement and our hard-working farmers and ranchers, our nations enjoy the world’s largest two-way trade in food and agricultural goods,” Vilsack and Villalobos said in a joint statement.

The ag secretaries reported that their discussions in Iowa highlighted the importance of continuing to work together to advance rural prosperity and to fulfill their shared responsibility to protect each country’s agricultural systems and producers, including collaborative efforts to prevent the spread of African swine fever and other animal and plant diseases and pests.

They also noted the increasingly urgent challenges of climate change, from excessive drought to more extreme fires.

“Agriculture faces the daunting task of producing more food to meet the nutritional needs of a growing world population while at the same time coping with climate change and ever-tightening natural resource constraints,” Vilsack and Villalobos say. “We are confident that our agricultural sectors will be a key part of the solution, with a focus on more inclusive rural development and continuing to provide good incomes to rural workers and plentiful supplies of high-quality agricultural products to consumers worldwide.”

They add that the United States and Mexico share a commitment to keeping their markets open and transparent so that trade can continue to grow, and that mutual commitment was reaffirmed in this week’s discussions.

Mexico is the second-largest market for U.S. dairy exports, just behind Southeast Asia, and by far the largest market for U.S. cheese exports, according to data from the U.S. Dairy Export Council.

CMN


September milk production up slightly from one year earlier

October 22, 2021

WASHINGTON — Milk production in the 24 major milk-producing states in September totaled 17.29 billion pounds, up 0.4% from September 2020, according to data released this week by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). For the entire United States, September milk production was estimated at 18.08 billion pounds, up 0.2% from September 2020. (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Milk Production chart on page 15.)

NASS reports August’s revised production for the 24 major states totaled 17.93 billion pounds, a decrease of 75 million pounds or 0.4% from last month’s preliminary production estimate.
September production per cow in the 24 major states averaged 1,937 pounds, 4 pounds below September 2020 and 67 pounds below August 2021. For the entire United States, production per cow in September is estimated at 1,918 pounds, 1 pound below September 2020 and 66 pounds below August.

NASS reports the number of milk cows on farms in the 24 major states was 8.93 million head in September, up 48,000 head from September 2020 but down 22,000 head from August. In the entire United States, there were an estimated 9.42 million milk cows in September, 27,000 cows more than September 2020 but 25,000 less than in August.

California led the nation’s milk production in September with 3.29 billion pounds of milk, up 0.2% from September 2020. Wisconsin followed with 2.60 billion pounds of milk produced in September, up 3.3% from September 2020.

CMN



Foremost Farms has built reputation on quality, customization over 25 years

BARABOO, Wis. — Foremost Farms USA, which last year celebrated the cooperative’s 25th anniversary, has built its reputation over the years as a provider of quality cheeses for foodservice, conversion and private labels.

Foremost Farms also is known for its customization, working with its customers to bring their ideas to reality.

“We have a flexible approach and work with a number of our customers on developing products unique to them. Customization can be in the product, delivery format, application performance or service level,” says Declan Roche, senior vice president and chief commercial officer, Foremost Farms USA.

Foremost Farms was formed in 1995 with the consolidation of Golden Guernsey and Wisconsin Dairies cooperatives, soon followed by the acquisition of Morning Glory Farms. Today there are about 1,000 member farms, mostly throughout Wisconsin and Michigan as well as some in southeast Minnesota, northeast Iowa, northern Illinois, northern Indiana and northwest Ohio. Foremost has a dairy campus in Greenville, Michigan, while the other nine processing plants, plus its headquarters, are in Wisconsin. The headquarters will be moving from Baraboo to Middleton, Wisconsin, around mid-2022. Foremost Farms employs about 1,000 people and produces approximately 500 million pounds of cheese a year.

“We have less plants and fewer farms, but twice the amount of milk as there was in 1995,” Roche says, noting farmers have applied the sciences of feed nutrition and breeding to enhance milk productivity.

In addition to expanded milk production, Foremost Farms over the years has expanded its portfolio. The 500 million pounds of cheese produced each year leaves about 250 million pounds of whey solids, used primarily for whey protein concentrate 34% (WPC-34) and permeate.

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Checkoff launches new wave of Undeniably Dairy campaign

October 15, 2021

WASHINGTON — The United States plans to enforce China’s trade commitments made under the phase one agreement and restart a targeted tariff exclusion process to protect U.S. economic interests, said U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai during a speech this week outlining the Biden-Harris administration’s new approach to the U.S.-China bilateral trade relationship.

In remarks presented Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Tai said that for too long, China’s lack of adherence to global trading norms has undercut the prosperity of Americans and others around the world.

“In recent years, Beijing has doubled down on its state-centered economic system,” she said. “It is increasingly clear that China’s plans do not include meaningful reforms to address these concerns that have been shared by the United States and many other countries.”

She added that while the phase one agreement, negotiated by the Trump administration, helped to stabilize the U.S. market and ease some tensions, it did not meaningfully address fundamental concerns with China’s trade practices and their harmful impacts on the U.S. economy, including the agriculture industry.

“While we have seen more exports to China in recent years, market share is shrinking and agriculture remains an unpredictable sector for U.S. farmers and ranchers who have come to rely heavily on this market,” Tai said in her speech. “China’s regulatory authorities continue to deploy measures that limit or threaten the market access for our producers — and their bottom line.”

She announced four main initial steps the administration will take to realign trade policies toward China to benefit U.S. priorities:

1. The United States will discuss China’s performance under the phase one agreement and enforce the commitments China made to benefit certain American industries, including agriculture.

2. While pursuing phase one enforcement, the United States will restart its targeted tariff exclusion process to mitigate the effects of certain Section 301 tariffs that raised costs on Americans.

3. Along with working to enforce terms of phase one, the United States will raise broader concerns with Beijing’s non-market policies and practices like abuse of state-owned
enterprises, anti-competitive behavior and subsidies, and the theft of intellectual property.

4. The United States will continue consulting and coordinating with allies and partners who share a strong interest in ensuring that the terms of competition are fair, work collectively to set the rules of the road for trade and technology in the 21st century, and strengthen the global market for U.S. workers and businesses.

“Our goal is to bring deliberative, stable, long-term thinking to our approach — and to work through bilateral and multilateral channels,” Tai said. “The core of our strategy is a commitment to ensuring we work with our allies to create fair and open markets.”

U.S. dairy industry leaders reacted to this announcement with hope and urged the administration to work toward more export opportunities to China.

Becky Rasdall, vice president of trade policy and international affairs for the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), notes China has been a top five market for U.S. dairy exports for nearly 20 years, and with the U.S. milk supply continuing to increase, a mutually beneficial trade relationship with China — the largest potential market for dairy — is critical. However, she adds, China also must be held to account for their commitments and actions.

“That is why IDFA was pleased to hear Ambassador Tai’s pledge to enforce the commitments made by China under the phase one agreement and to remain vigilant in defending the interests of U.S. agriculture from any current or future trade distorting practices,” Rasdall says. “China’s government-controlled market and overt interest in developing its own domestic sourcing and export capacity for food and agricultural products underscore the nation’s willingness and ability to turn off U.S. agricultural imports when convenient — a concerning trend pointing to the need for the United States to advance a deeper, more strategic position on trade policy with China.”

As the United States exports nearly 20% of its milk production, IDFA members rely more and more on effective U.S. trade policy to liberalize markets, provide preferential access and produce stable, rules-based trading opportunities for U.S. dairy exporters, Rasdall says.

“China will always need the productivity and reliability of U.S. food and agriculture producers,” she says. “Therefore, while the developments outlined (this week) by Ambassador Tai demonstrate this administration’s willingness to defend the interests of U.S. dairy, IDFA is hopeful for constructive efforts to facilitate trade with China. We look forward to collaborating with USTR and other agencies on efforts to ensure U.S. agriculture is best positioned in a competitive global marketplace.”

U.S. Dairy Export Council President and CEO Krysta Harden says the announced actions on tariffs will benefit U.S. dairy.

“What China does impacts dairy markets all around the world given what a large purchaser of dairy products they are,” she says. “American dairy farmers and manufacturers count on the ability for our products to meet China’s appetite for dairy, yet retaliatory tariffs continue to weigh down our prospects there. Long-term tariff waivers are critical to help unlock more of the potential in that market. In addition, it’s key that the administration encourages China to boost its purchasing of major dairy commodities such as milk powder and cheese that it is still primarily sourcing from other suppliers.”

Dairy farmers welcome the administration’s new approach to the U.S.-China trade relationship, says National Milk Producers Federation President and CEO Jim Mulhern, noting China’s tremendous importance to global dairy markets.

“To date, China has delivered on the multiple dairy regulatory commitments they made in the phase one agreement. But retaliatory tariffs continue to put a drag on our sales, and our market share in key dairy commodities such as milk powder and cheese lags far behind that of our competitors,” Mulhern says. “We urge the administration to press China for substantial progress on these two fronts so that dairy farmers and cooperatives are better positioned to supply China’s growing dairy needs.”

CMN


Whitehall Specialties Inc. is acquired by Irish co-op Ornua

October 15, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. dairy product exports in August were valued at $689.5 million, up 25.9% from a year earlier, according to the latest data reported by the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). August dairy exports on a milk solids basis totaled 198,032 metric tons, up 12.6% from August 2020. (For complete U.S. dairy export data, visit the new interactive USDEC Data Hub at www.usdec.org/research-and-data/market-information/usdec-data-hub.)

Nonfat dry milk/skim milk powder (NDM/SMP) exports in August totaled 78,908 metric tons, up 15.4% from August 2020, USDEC reports. August shipments to the top NDM/SMP market, Mexico, totaled 33,048 metric tons in August and so far are up 25% year-to-date from the first eight months of 2020. Shipments to the second-largest market, Southeast Asia, totaled 29,345 metric tons in August, with the year-to-date total down nearly 3% from the same period last year.

The United States exported a total of 54,571 metric tons of dry whey products in August, up 9.2% from August 2020, USDEC reports. Exports to leading whey market China are significantly higher year-to-date, with whey (0404.10) up 59% and whey protein concentrate 80 (WPC80) up 37% from January-August 2020.

August cheese exports totaled 36,572 metric tons, up 18.1% from a year earlier. USDEC Economic Analyst Stephen Cain notes in the latest U.S. Dairy Exporter Blog that while top market Mexico remains a crucial source of growth for cheese exports, the rest of Latin America grew an impressive 57% year-over-year, supported by continued economic recovery.

“U.S. cheese exports for the rest of the year are anticipated to remain strong,” Cain adds. “Global demand for cheese is growing faster than normal, with year-to-date global cheese trade up 6% (compared to the average annual growth rate of 3%). This global uptick in demand paired with U.S. product availability puts the U.S. in a strong position to see robust growth in cheese exports through the end of the year.”

U.S. exports of lactose totaled 30,673 metric tons in August, up 5.3% from a year earlier. Year-to-date exports of lactose to Southeast Asia have dropped 1.4%, while January-August lactose exports to China are up 25% from the same period last year, USDEC reports.

CMN


USDA lowers milk production, increases most price forecasts

October 15, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. cheese production, excluding cottage cheese, in August totaled 1.140 billion pounds, up 4.4% from August 2020’s 1.092 billion pounds, according to data released this week by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Dairy Production chart.) August’s total was down 0.3% from July’s 1.143 billion pounds.

Italian-type cheese production in August totaled 484.8 million pounds, up 8.8% from August 2020. Production of Mozzarella, the largest component of Italian-type cheese production, totaled 379.4 million pounds in August, up 6.7% from a year earlier.

American-type cheese production in August totaled 451.9 million pounds, up 1.5% from August 2020. Production of Cheddar, the largest component of American-type cheese, totaled 318.4 million pounds in August, down 1.5% from August 2020.

Wisconsin was the leading cheese-producing state with 294.0 million pounds produced in August, up 5.1% from August 2020. California produced the second most cheese in August at 201.7 million pounds, up 5.4% from a year earlier.

U.S. production of butter totaled 148.4 million pounds in August, down 1.7% from August 2020 and down 1.5% from July 2021. California led the nation in butter production with 51.3 million pounds in August, up 1.8% from August 2020.

CMN


Industry hopes new approach to China will help dairy trade

October 8, 2021

WASHINGTON — The United States plans to enforce China’s trade commitments made under the phase one agreement and restart a targeted tariff exclusion process to protect U.S. economic interests, said U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai during a speech this week outlining the Biden-Harris administration’s new approach to the U.S.-China bilateral trade relationship.

In remarks presented Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Tai said that for too long, China’s lack of adherence to global trading norms has undercut the prosperity of Americans and others around the world.

“In recent years, Beijing has doubled down on its state-centered economic system,” she said. “It is increasingly clear that China’s plans do not include meaningful reforms to address these concerns that have been shared by the United States and many other countries.”

She added that while the phase one agreement, negotiated by the Trump administration, helped to stabilize the U.S. market and ease some tensions, it did not meaningfully address fundamental concerns with China’s trade practices and their harmful impacts on the U.S. economy, including the agriculture industry.

“While we have seen more exports to China in recent years, market share is shrinking and agriculture remains an unpredictable sector for U.S. farmers and ranchers who have come to rely heavily on this market,” Tai said in her speech. “China’s regulatory authorities continue to deploy measures that limit or threaten the market access for our producers — and their bottom line.”

She announced four main initial steps the administration will take to realign trade policies toward China to benefit U.S. priorities:

1. The United States will discuss China’s performance under the phase one agreement and enforce the commitments China made to benefit certain American industries, including agriculture.

2. While pursuing phase one enforcement, the United States will restart its targeted tariff exclusion process to mitigate the effects of certain Section 301 tariffs that raised costs on Americans.

3. Along with working to enforce terms of phase one, the United States will raise broader concerns with Beijing’s non-market policies and practices like abuse of state-owned
enterprises, anti-competitive behavior and subsidies, and the theft of intellectual property.

4. The United States will continue consulting and coordinating with allies and partners who share a strong interest in ensuring that the terms of competition are fair, work collectively to set the rules of the road for trade and technology in the 21st century, and strengthen the global market for U.S. workers and businesses.

“Our goal is to bring deliberative, stable, long-term thinking to our approach — and to work through bilateral and multilateral channels,” Tai said. “The core of our strategy is a commitment to ensuring we work with our allies to create fair and open markets.”

U.S. dairy industry leaders reacted to this announcement with hope and urged the administration to work toward more export opportunities to China.

Becky Rasdall, vice president of trade policy and international affairs for the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), notes China has been a top five market for U.S. dairy exports for nearly 20 years, and with the U.S. milk supply continuing to increase, a mutually beneficial trade relationship with China — the largest potential market for dairy — is critical. However, she adds, China also must be held to account for their commitments and actions.

“That is why IDFA was pleased to hear Ambassador Tai’s pledge to enforce the commitments made by China under the phase one agreement and to remain vigilant in defending the interests of U.S. agriculture from any current or future trade distorting practices,” Rasdall says. “China’s government-controlled market and overt interest in developing its own domestic sourcing and export capacity for food and agricultural products underscore the nation’s willingness and ability to turn off U.S. agricultural imports when convenient — a concerning trend pointing to the need for the United States to advance a deeper, more strategic position on trade policy with China.”

As the United States exports nearly 20% of its milk production, IDFA members rely more and more on effective U.S. trade policy to liberalize markets, provide preferential access and produce stable, rules-based trading opportunities for U.S. dairy exporters, Rasdall says.

“China will always need the productivity and reliability of U.S. food and agriculture producers,” she says. “Therefore, while the developments outlined (this week) by Ambassador Tai demonstrate this administration’s willingness to defend the interests of U.S. dairy, IDFA is hopeful for constructive efforts to facilitate trade with China. We look forward to collaborating with USTR and other agencies on efforts to ensure U.S. agriculture is best positioned in a competitive global marketplace.”

U.S. Dairy Export Council President and CEO Krysta Harden says the announced actions on tariffs will benefit U.S. dairy.

“What China does impacts dairy markets all around the world given what a large purchaser of dairy products they are,” she says. “American dairy farmers and manufacturers count on the ability for our products to meet China’s appetite for dairy, yet retaliatory tariffs continue to weigh down our prospects there. Long-term tariff waivers are critical to help unlock more of the potential in that market. In addition, it’s key that the administration encourages China to boost its purchasing of major dairy commodities such as milk powder and cheese that it is still primarily sourcing from other suppliers.”

Dairy farmers welcome the administration’s new approach to the U.S.-China trade relationship, says National Milk Producers Federation President and CEO Jim Mulhern, noting China’s tremendous importance to global dairy markets.

“To date, China has delivered on the multiple dairy regulatory commitments they made in the phase one agreement. But retaliatory tariffs continue to put a drag on our sales, and our market share in key dairy commodities such as milk powder and cheese lags far behind that of our competitors,” Mulhern says. “We urge the administration to press China for substantial progress on these two fronts so that dairy farmers and cooperatives are better positioned to supply China’s growing dairy needs.”

CMN


August U.S. dairy export value rises 25.9%

October 8, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. dairy product exports in August were valued at $689.5 million, up 25.9% from a year earlier, according to the latest data reported by the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). August dairy exports on a milk solids basis totaled 198,032 metric tons, up 12.6% from August 2020. (For complete U.S. dairy export data, visit the new interactive USDEC Data Hub at www.usdec.org/research-and-data/market-information/usdec-data-hub.)

Nonfat dry milk/skim milk powder (NDM/SMP) exports in August totaled 78,908 metric tons, up 15.4% from August 2020, USDEC reports. August shipments to the top NDM/SMP market, Mexico, totaled 33,048 metric tons in August and so far are up 25% year-to-date from the first eight months of 2020. Shipments to the second-largest market, Southeast Asia, totaled 29,345 metric tons in August, with the year-to-date total down nearly 3% from the same period last year.

The United States exported a total of 54,571 metric tons of dry whey products in August, up 9.2% from August 2020, USDEC reports. Exports to leading whey market China are significantly higher year-to-date, with whey (0404.10) up 59% and whey protein concentrate 80 (WPC80) up 37% from January-August 2020.

August cheese exports totaled 36,572 metric tons, up 18.1% from a year earlier. USDEC Economic Analyst Stephen Cain notes in the latest U.S. Dairy Exporter Blog that while top market Mexico remains a crucial source of growth for cheese exports, the rest of Latin America grew an impressive 57% year-over-year, supported by continued economic recovery.

“U.S. cheese exports for the rest of the year are anticipated to remain strong,” Cain adds. “Global demand for cheese is growing faster than normal, with year-to-date global cheese trade up 6% (compared to the average annual growth rate of 3%). This global uptick in demand paired with U.S. product availability puts the U.S. in a strong position to see robust growth in cheese exports through the end of the year.”

U.S. exports of lactose totaled 30,673 metric tons in August, up 5.3% from a year earlier. Year-to-date exports of lactose to Southeast Asia have dropped 1.4%, while January-August lactose exports to China are up 25% from the same period last year, USDEC reports.

CMN


Cheese production in August is up 4.4% from a year earlier

October 8, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. cheese production, excluding cottage cheese, in August totaled 1.140 billion pounds, up 4.4% from August 2020’s 1.092 billion pounds, according to data released this week by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Dairy Production chart.) August’s total was down 0.3% from July’s 1.143 billion pounds.

Italian-type cheese production in August totaled 484.8 million pounds, up 8.8% from August 2020. Production of Mozzarella, the largest component of Italian-type cheese production, totaled 379.4 million pounds in August, up 6.7% from a year earlier.

American-type cheese production in August totaled 451.9 million pounds, up 1.5% from August 2020. Production of Cheddar, the largest component of American-type cheese, totaled 318.4 million pounds in August, down 1.5% from August 2020.

Wisconsin was the leading cheese-producing state with 294.0 million pounds produced in August, up 5.1% from August 2020. California produced the second most cheese in August at 201.7 million pounds, up 5.4% from a year earlier.

U.S. production of butter totaled 148.4 million pounds in August, down 1.7% from August 2020 and down 1.5% from July 2021. California led the nation in butter production with 51.3 million pounds in August, up 1.8% from August 2020.

CMN


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Today's Cheese Spot Trading
October 27, 2021


Barrels: $1.8475 (+1 3/4)
Blocks: $1.7575 (-1 1/2)


Click here for more market activity
Cheese Production
U.S. Total Aug.
1.140 bil. lbs.


Milk Production
U.S. Total Sept.
18.075 bil. lbs.

Guest Columnist

Continuing headwinds — know your consumer, understand their behavior

Ty Rohloff, Compeer Financial

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