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USDA to purchase $50 million in fluid milk for hunger relief

Aug. 17, 2018

WASHINGTON — USDA this week announced plans to purchase whole, 1-percent, 2-percent and skim fluid milk in half gallons for distribution to The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP).

The first-of-its-kind purchase of fluid milk will be made “under the authority of Section 32 of the Act of August 24, 1935, with the purpose to encourage the continued domestic consumption of these products by diverting them from the normal channels of trade and commerce,” USDA says.

USDA notes the purchases are part of the normal operations of administering Section 32 and are not related or associated with the authority or administration of possible purchases under Section 5 of the Commodity Credit Corp. related to trade mitigation. Stakeholders say USDA expects to announce official guidelines for distribution of that previously announced $12 billion aid package for farmers by Aug. 24. (See “Industry reacts to ‘bailout’ for farmers due to tariff pressure” in the July 27, 2018, issue of Cheese Market News.)

Solicitations for this announced fluid milk purchase will be issued in the near future and will be available electronically through the Web-Based Supply Chain Management (WBSCM) system, USDA says. A hard copy of the solicitation will not be available. All future information regarding this acquisition, including solicitation amendments and award notices, will be published through WBSCM and on the Agricultural Marketing Service’s website at www.ams.usda.gov/selling-food.

USDA says the contract type is anticipated to be firm-fixed price. Deliveries are expected to be to various locations in the United States on an FOB destination basis.

Pursuant to Agricultural Acquisition Regulation 470.103(b), commodities and the products of agricultural commodities acquired under this contract must be a product of the United States and shall be considered to be such a product if it is grown, processed and otherwise prepared for sale or distribution exclusively in the United States. Packaging and container components under this acquisition will be the only portion subject to the World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and Free Trade Agreements, as addressed by FAR clause 52.225-5.

To be eligible to submit offers, potential contractors must meet the AMS vendor qualification requirements. Details of these requirements are available online at www.ams.usda.gov/selling-food/becoming-approved.

A pre-bid conference call to discuss the pending solicitation process will be held Aug. 22 from 1 to 2 p.m. EST. To join the call, dial 888-844-9904 and enter access code 1801764. A transcript of questions and answers will be shared on the AMS Commodity Procurement Website following the call.

The pasteurized fluid milk purchased will be distributed through food assistance programs and food banks, such as those under Feeding America, the nation’s largest domestic hunger relief organization. Stakeholders say USDA is expected to purchase between 12 to 15 million gallons of milk.

“As many as 41 million Americans, including nearly 13 million children, face hunger daily and are at risk of missing out on essential nutrients when they don’t have access to milk,” says Michael Dykes, president and CEO of the International Dairy Foods Association. “Simply having more milk available for those in need can make a positive impact on public health.”
Dykes adds this purchase will address one of the United States’ most significant challenges — hunger — and, at the same time, will have a positive impact on the dairy industry at a time of significant market uncertainty.

Julia Kadison, CEO of the Milk Processor Education Program, notes that milk is one of the most requested nutrition staples at food banks, yet it is rarely available.

“As one out of two kids ages 9 and up are falling short on calcium, vitamin D and potassium — essential nutrients that milk provides — there is an even greater need to make sure milk is getting to children and families who need it most,” she says.

Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), says NMPF is pleased that USDA now is including fluid milk in the assortment of foods it is buying and donating.

“This effort will help more Americans meet their U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommended daily consumption of milk,” Mulhern says. “We appreciate this initial step and look forward to working with the department to continue building upon this effort.”

For more information, contact Contracting Officer Jeffrey Jackson via email at jeffreyF.jackson@ams.usda.gov.

CMN


State fairs offer unique venues for dairy promotion activities

Aug. 17, 2018

By Rena Archwamety

MADISON, Wis. — Each summer, state fairs across the country celebrate agriculture with animal and culinary contests, family entertainment, and an array of foods served fried, on-a-stick, or in unorthodox combinations.

State fairs also traditionally have served as ideal showcases for the dairy industry, mixing food, fun activities and educational opportunities. From milking demonstrations, to grilled cheese and milkshake stands, to butter sculptures and dairy princesses, state and regional dairy organizations put great effort into creating positive and accessible dairy experiences for fairgoers.

“Milk is California’s top agricultural product — significant for such a rich ag state — and nearly 20 percent of the nation’s milk supply comes from here, but consumers are increasingly disconnected, especially in urban centers like Sacramento where the state fair is hosted,” says Jennifer Giambroni, director of communications, California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB). “This is why representation is important for dairy as a way to connect with these local consumers, upwards of 750,000 people each year, so they get a better idea of not only where their food comes from but the assortment of wonderful dairy foods that come from fluid milk.”

In many states, dairy foods and activities are sponsored by farmer-funded organizations, such as CMAB, Midwest Dairy and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. In Wisconsin, much of the activity is organized by the Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Promotion Board, made up of around 20 individuals from various ag and non-ag backgrounds who are dedicated to supporting the dairy industry. Local dairy processors and suppliers, 4-H clubs and student organizations also often provide support through donating time or resources at the state fairs.

• Cheese, please!

One of the most popular featured foods at many state fairs recently has been grilled cheese sandwiches, ranging from standard American to more elaborate variations.

A new Grilled Bacon Mac and Cheese sandwich debuted at this year’s Missouri State Fair, which opened Aug. 9 and runs through Aug. 19. The featured grilled cheese is sold at the Gerken Dairy Center, one of the Missouri State Fair’s most popular concessions owned by the state’s dairy farm families, along with standard grilled cheese, 19 hand-dipped ice cream flavors and shakes.

“We hadn’t had a new product for quite a while,” says Stacy Dohle, Midwest Dairy’s Missouri State Fair manager. “Earlier this year in March, we did a promotion with a local retailer in Springfield. There was a kids’ cooking class, and some kids put together a mac and cheese, bacon and grilled cheese sandwich. We thought it would be fun at the fair. It’s going over really well so far. Anything with bacon and cheese, how could you go wrong? It looks like it may be a permanent item here before too long.”

The American Dairy Association of Indiana (ADAI) sponsors an annual grilled cheese contest Indiana State Fair, which runs through Aug. 19. The winning grilled cheese then is featured the following year at the Indiana State Fair Dairy Bar, also supported by ADAI.

“It started as a milk tent in the 1940s, where all they served was milk,” says Jenni Browning, senior director of communications and wellness, ADAI. “Now it’s a huge Dairy Bar with a variety of grilled cheese sandwiches and milkshakes, along with milk, pretzels and cheese, yogurt, kids’ meals, scooped ice cream and Mozzarella sticks.”

This year’s featured sandwich (and last year’s contest winner) is the Inside Out grilled cheese, which includes a crunchy crust of mild Cheddar on the outside of garlic bread and Gouda on the inside. The Dairy Bar also sells the Mousetrap Grilled Cheese with slices of medium Cheddar, Havarti and Colby Jack on Texas-style toast, and classic grilled cheeses American on white, Colby on wheat and Muenster on cinnamon raisin bread. The winner of this year’s grilled cheese contest, which will be featured at next year’s Indiana State Fair, is Sweet Blue Haired Granny made with Chicory Blue cheese, Nightshade hard cheese and cultured butter with sea salt from Tulip Tree Creamery, paired with rosemary, Granny Smith apple and Indiana wildflower honey on sourdough.

At the Wisconsin State Fair, which ended Aug. 12, sales at the Real Wisconsin Cheese Grill are the main source of funding for the Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Promotion Board. This year, the stand made more than 55,000 sandwiches using more than 5,000 pounds of Sargento cheese and 1,000 pounds of butter from Foremost Farms. Varieties included Cheddar, Swiss, Pepper Jack, Gouda and Havarti.

“With that money, we are able to share stories through our House of Moo with milking demonstrations and different activities,” says Katy Katzman, board coordinator, Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Promotion Board. “Most of this is funded through $3 grilled cheese.”

• Dairy competitions

In addition to traditional livestock competitions, many state fairs feature dairy product competitions and dairy princess crownings, as well as other, less formal contests aimed at making dairy fun. The Oregon State Fair’s Milk Chug-a-lug and Milk Mustache contests, which will be Sept. 1, are sponsored by the state’s dairy princess program that is supported by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. The Chug-a-lug contest, open to anyone, is a race to see who can drink a pint of milk the fastest, while the Milk Mustache contest is geared more toward kids.

“They use a milkshake mix so they can get a good mustache. The dairy princesses will judge to see who has the best mustache, and they get a prize,” says Pete Kent, executive director, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

The Minnesota State Fair, which starts Aug. 23, this year will feature the winner of the fourth annual Flavor of the Fair contest, “That’s S’more Like it,” in malts and sundaes served at Midwest Dairy’s Dairy Goodness Bar. Fairgoers will be encouraged to suggest new creative flavors or possible combinations for the 2019 contest.

“In the spring, we pick three unique flavors and have people vote. This year there were over 2,000 votes,” says Alex Larson, manager, marketing communications, Midwest Dairy.

State Fair-recipe vanilla ice cream or malts will be topped with graham cereal, tiny marshmallows and chocolate syrup, joining traditional flavors at the Minnesota State Fair.

“In addition to continuing to serve favorites like chocolate, vanilla, apple-caramel, rhubarb-strawberry and more, we love to introduce other flavors that get fairgoers excited about what dairy farmers have to offer,” says Alyssa Olson, Midwest Dairy’s Minnesota State Fair project manager.

• Education on display

Butter sculptures, usually featuring cows, are a mainstay at many state fair dairy displays. But the Minnesota State Fair takes a different approach, carving the likeness of the newly-crowned Princess Kay of the Milky Way as well as each of the 11 Princess Kay finalists in butter. The butter carvings also serve as an educational opportunity, where Princess Kay and the finalists share their dairy stories and answer questions from the crowd as they take turns sitting inside the 40-degree, rotating sculpting booth. They also will appear in Midwest Dairy’s educational area across from the butter sculptures to share stories and answer questions about farmers’ commitments to health, animal care and the environment. This year’s butter carvings will begin Aug. 23, the day after the new Princess Kay is announced. The dairy princess carvings started at the Minnesota State Fair in 1965.

“It takes about six hours to complete a butter sculpture, Larson says. “They take breaks, but they bundle up and spend the majority of that time in there. It’s very much a moment they savor and remember throughout their life. It’s a very iconic tradition in Minnesota, the butter heads.”

The Iowa State Fair this year introduced its first Farm to Fair Dinner, where 500 guests joined Iowa farmers at the “largest dinner table ever set” at the Iowa State Fair Aug. 12. Attendees had an opportunity to eat, learn, engage and discover facts about Iowa farming and food. A meal made by the Machine Shed restaurant featured locally-sourced ingredients. Included in the meal was milk as well as beef brisket sandwiches topped with cheese.

“We were able to invite 10 of our dairy farmers to the table. So they could have a very engaging conversation, organizers put out a survey asking people what they want to talk about and what questions they had. Some people had dairy questions and questions about milking, so we chose those,” says Alyson Fendrick, manager, marketing communications, Midwest Dairy, Iowa.

At the Wisconsin State Fair, located near Milwaukee, Katzman says interactions with farmers and live animals are some of the most popular dairy-related activities.

“I think because we’re reaching out to a more urban audience, the chance to get up close and personal with live animals is exciting, and they’re going to remember that experience for a lifetime,” she says. “There’s still lots of opportunity to get our message out there. Small and positive interactions the public can have with our industry do go a long way.”

The California Milk Advisory Board featured a panel display on Healthy Communities, Healthy Land, Healthy Cows and Healthy Food at this year’s California State Fair July 13-29. In 2017, a dairy station also was added to the on-site California State Fair Farm in partnership with Dairy Council of California for use during the school year. During the state fair, this information about dairy production and nutrition is available to attendees in the Baby Barn, where they also can access “Cali” the Real California Milk mechanical milking cow.

“The state fair provides a platform for connecting consumers to where their food comes from in a very real way — with the livestock and the people who are responsible for the dairy foods they enjoy,” Giambroni says. “The fair is a unique experience, one of the few places beyond a direct trip to the farm, where you get up close and personal with livestock and can ask a farmer or a farm kid a question about dairy production and on-farm practices and truly understand our shared values.”

CMN


U.S.-Mexico NAFTA talks resume; tariffs continue

Aug. 17, 2018

WASHINGTON — The United States and Mexico this week resumed talks to try to find solutions to the outstanding bilateral issues within the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Canada has not been party to these recent talks.

Movement on U.S.-Mexico issues remains slow, and even once there is consensus, the United States still will have to find solutions to address the U.S.-Canadian differences, notes the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA).

President Trump repeatedly has called for the end of Canada’s protectionist dairy policies. As such, Class 7 pricing in Canada likely will be at the center of the discussion when the United States and Canada eventually meet, IDFA says.

Negotiators are also putting off talks on a “sunset clause.” The sunset language would require all three countries to convene every five years to re-approve the agreement or it would be automatically nullified. Canada and Mexico have objected to a NAFTA that includes this stipulation.

IDFA notes it continues to work closely with the administration during these negotiations to ensure market access will be maintained in Mexico and Canada’s Class 7 pricing program is eliminated.

Meanwhile, escalation in tit-for-tat tariff increases continues between the United States and China. This week, news reports say a Chinese delegation led by Vice Minister of Commerce Wang Shouwen will, at the invitation of the United States, visit the United States in late August to talk about bilateral economic and trade issues, according to China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOC).

In response to the ongoing tariff disputes, late last week, the Western States Dairy Producers Association (WSDPA) — an association of dairy farmer trade associations including the California Milk Producers Council (MPC), Idaho Dairymen’s Association and others — sent a letter to U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue outlining the significant impacts current trade disputes are having on U.S. farms.

In the letter, the association outlines ways that USDA can use its recently announced $12 billion farmer “bailout” to help the U.S. agriculture industry, particularly the dairy sector. (See “Industry reacts to ‘bailout’ for farmers due to tariff pressure” in the July 27, 2018, issue of Cheese Market News.)

“We calculate that the cost of the trade war to American dairy farmers will be close to $1.4 billion between June 1, 2018, and the end of this year,” says Kevin Abernathy, general manager, MPC. “This is a huge hit, which causes real pain and damage to the dairy farming community.”

In the letter, WSDPA recommends a compensation process that it says will get the help to where it’s needed in the most direct and expeditious fashion.

“The Western states market a disproportionate percentage of our milk and dairy products to foreign buyers who are now engaged in this trade dispute with the United States,” the letter says. “What this means is that Western dairy farmers are on the front lines in the trade war.”

The letter notes that historically, many dairy assistance programs have been targeted toward small and medium sized farms.
“Dairies in the West are significantly larger than the national average, but the erosion of milk prices as a result of the trade war impacts all dairy farmers on all of their milk production,” the letter says. “Our members implore that any direct payments to dairy farmers be distributed on all milk produced, without production caps. Any other outcomes would disproportionately saddle our member dairies with the consequences of market losses.”

WSDPA says that its recommendation is that USDA provide direct assistance to all dairy producers of $1 per hundredweight of milk produced over a 6-month period of time from June 2018 to November 2018.

“Based on actual milk production for June 2018 and estimates for production going forward, we calculate the cost of such payments to be approximately $1 billion,” the association says.

USDA also has indicated that in addition to direct cash payments to producers, the authority of the Commodity Credit Corp. will be used to develop a program to purchase dairy products directly from the market.

“We have some advice on that issue as well. It is important that any purchases not unnecessarily disrupt the supply/demand balancing that naturally goes on in the dairy industry under normal marketing conditions,” WSDPA says. “We also encourage that purchases of dairy products in addition to cheese, butter and powder be made if it is determined that such purchases would have a greater impact on balancing supply and demand.”

CMN



USDA announces further shuffling of agency offices

Aug. 17, 2018

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue recently announced further reorganization of USDA that the department says is intended to improve customer service, strengthen offices and programs, and save taxpayer dollars.

The Economic Research Service (ERS), currently under USDA’s Research, Education and Economics mission area, will realign once again with the Office of the Chief Economist (OCE) under the Office of the Secretary. Additionally, most employees of ERS and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) will be relocated outside of the national capital region. The movement of the employees outside of Washington, D.C., is expected to be completed by the end of 2019.

“It’s been our goal to make USDA the most effective, efficient and customer-focused department in the entire federal government,” Perdue says. “In our administration, we have looked critically at the way we do business, with the ultimate goal of ensuring the best service possible for our customers and for the taxpayers of the United States. In some cases, this has meant realigning some of our offices and functions, or even relocating them, in order to make more logical sense or provide more streamlined and efficient services.”

Moving ERS back together with OCE under the Office of the Secretary makes sense because the two have similar missions, Perdue says. ERS studies and anticipates trends and emerging issues, while OCE advises the secretary and Congress on the economic implications of policies and programs. These two agencies were aligned once before, and bringing them back together will enhance the effectiveness of economic analysis at USDA, he says.

Regarding the relocation of ERS and NIFA, Perdue says new locations are yet to be determined, and it is possible that ERS and NIFA may be co-located when their new homes are found. USDA is undertaking the relocations for three main reasons:

• To improve USDA’s ability to attract and retain highly-qualified staff with training and interests in agriculture, many of whom come from land grant universities. USDA has experienced significant turnover in these positions, and it has been difficult to recruit employees to the Washington, D.C., area, particularly given the high cost of living and long commutes, Perdue says.

• To place these USDA resources closer to many of stakeholders, most of whom live and work far from the Washington, D.C., area.

• To benefit the American taxpayers. There will be significant savings on employment costs and rent, which will allow more employees to be retained in the long run, even in the face of tightening budgets, Perdue says.

No ERS or NIFA employees will be involuntarily separated. Every employee who wants to continue working will have an opportunity to do so, although that will mean moving to a new location for most. Employees will be offered relocation assistance.

For those who are interested, USDA is seeking approval from the Office of Personnel Management and the Office of Management and Budget for both Voluntary Early Retirement Authority and Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments.

“None of this reflects on the jobs being done by our ERS or NIFA employees, and in fact, I frequently tell my Cabinet colleagues that USDA has the best workforce in the federal government,” Perdue says. “These changes are more steps down the path to better service to our customers, and will help us fulfill our informal motto to ‘Do right and feed everyone.’”

Perdue previously announced other significant changes at USDA. In May 2017, USDA created the first-ever Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs and reconstituted and renamed the new Farm Production and Conservation mission area, among other realignments. In addition, in September 2017, Perdue realigned a number of offices to improve customer service and maximize efficiency. Those actions involved consolidation and the rearrangement of certain offices into more logical organizational reporting structures, USDA says.

CMN


New plant gives Queso Campesino ability to serve additional customers

By Kate Sander

BRUSH, Colo. — Queso Campesino, which began cheese production in its new facility in Brush, Colorado, in 2017, is positioning itself for growth and looking for new customers and distributors who seek authentic Hispanic-style cheeses.

Officially known as Colorado Ranchers Inc., the company is often known by its brand name, Queso Campesino, which can be translated as “working man’s cheese.” It is owned by managing partner Gabriel Robles, who has long specialized in Hispanic cheese, along with other investors. The cheese is available throughout the United States.

Robles says his aim is to provide both Hispanic and Anglo consumers with high-quality, authentic Hispanic cheese and great customer service. He has worked long and hard to get to this point, and he is excited about the possibilities the company’s new plant affords.

When the company was first founded in the 1990s, it briefly made Asadero, Queso Fresco and Menonita, a mild semi-firm cheese comparable to extra mild Gouda, in a small plant. For the rest of its cheese, the company contracted with producers throughout the United States and Mexico to market 13 other Mexican cheeses. Eventually, though, all of its cheeses were made by partners, and the company focused on marketing.

“We took it as a challenge to go through the United States to cherry pick the best cheese,” Robles says.

“We’ve built the business a little differently,” adds Lynn Rimpley, vice president of sales and marketing. “Some companies start with the plant and move to the product, but we’ve focused on product, product, product, which is more important than the plant. The company focused on creating an image and procuring product with the right flavor.”

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Blockchain holds promise for traceability, transparency

Aug. 10, 2018

By Rena Archwamety

WASHINGTON — As the food chain has grown larger and more complex — from farmers and growers, to processors and ingredient suppliers, to distribution networks and retailers — traceability has become increasingly challenging. In a webinar hosted this week by the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), Frank Yiannas, vice president-food safety for Walmart, discussed the benefits of blockchain technology and how it offers benefits beyond just traceability, such as greater transparency, reduced food waste and better regulatory compliance.

Blockchain, initially implemented to record and verify virtual bitcoin transactions, more recently has become the latest buzz in technology for other industries that benefit from traceability, including the food industry. Many picture food chain traceability as a centralized, linear system. However, any unexpected or unrecorded change along this type of system — such as a change in ingredient or supplier — leaves this model open to inaccuracies.

Blockchain is a decentralized and distributed system, where transactions are entered across a complex network and records cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks and the consensus of the entire network.

“Data is converted into an alphanumeric sequence, or ‘hash,’ and placed on the blockchain,” Yiannas says. “Others agree to it, see it is accurate, and now have a record of it. As new blocks of information are added, you can trust that it’s accurate and can’t be changed. You can trace that chain of custody back to one common version of the truth.”

For example, he explains how Walmart worked with IBM on a pilot blockchain project, tracing a package of sliced mangos from the grower all the way to the store shelf. Information uploaded into blockchain included where the mangos were grown, processed, packaged, transported, held in distribution centers and ultimately stocked in stores.

Using conventional record systems, such as receipts and other paperwork, it took almost seven days to trace back to where the mangos originated. With blockchain, a code on the mango package could be scanned and the source located in 2.2 seconds.

“It’s food traceability at the speed of thought,” Yiannas says.

“People want to map out their supply chain,” he adds. “The problem is, as soon as something in the supply chain changes, it is no longer valid. Here, we are not mapping supply chains. We’re capturing food products as they flow through the system. It’s equivalent to FedEx tracking — every time it makes it to a point, the product is scanned and reported. You can keep track of how it is traveling through the system.”

Blockchain is a game-changer for food safety, Yiannas says. He notes the recent widespread E. coli outbreak linked to romaine and how long it took to trace the source of the contaminated product, and how wide the recall net was due to the lack of efficient, accurate traceability.

Access to more detailed traceability also allows businesses to identify and resolve delays in the distribution process, allowing for fresher products and less food waste. Additionally, it can help combat food fraud and help track and implement regulatory requirements in a more timely manner.

Beyond traceability, he says, blockchain also offers greater transparency, holding people in the food chain responsible for their handling of the product as well as offering consumers more information about how it was produced.

“With dairy in particular, traceability is not good enough,” Yiannas says. “This also enhances the ability to talk and tell a story to the consumer. Today, most people are not involved in food production, but they want to have a say in how their food is produced. They can scan a gallon of milk and find out more about where it came from, how far it traveled, meet the farmer and learn how it was produced.”

While blockchain requires the participation of many parts of the food production and distribution chain, Yiannas says it can be fairly simple to participate.

“Oftentimes, people think this is only for big players,” he says. “That’s not the case, and the food system is very diversified. Even big players are doing business with small farmers. The basic components you need are the equivalent of a smart device and access to the internet.”

There is a lot of conversation about business models for blockchain, including cost of entry and the value it provides to participants. Yiannas notes that similar to other popular networks, such as LinkedIn or Twitter, the initial entry barrier to a blockchain system could be low or free, with costs associated with the value of information extracted.

“As it becomes available, there may be free entry models. You get in, declare who you are and put your data in,” he explains. “The only time you pay is when you start extracting value and want to view the traceability.”

In addition to the basic hardware and participation of members in the supply chain, Yiannas says businesses considering blockchain should make sure they are following good manufacturing practices and that employees are engaged in the process.

“The first thing is to get your house in order and make sure you are adopting GS1 standards,” he says. “Blockchain technology coupled with GS1 standards allow for scalability. These standards are the universal language blockchain will use to communicate.”

Blockchain also allows for certain information to remain confidential, something of concern in many supplier relationships. Whoever puts a data into a blockchain system owns that data and can decide who they want to share it with, Yiannas explains.

Since its initial pilot a year ago, Walmart now has moved to the production and implementation of blockchain systems among 10 major brands, including Danone, Nestle and Unilever. Walmart currently has 25 SKUs in blockchain and has tracked millions of food packages. In June alone, Yiannas says, Walmart tracked more than 160,000 traceability events.

“No single entity can do it alone,” he says. “Together, if we work with suppliers and stakeholders in the food chain, we can do so much. I’m convinced this is a big idea — I don’t think it’s hype. We will continue to see blockchain applicability and smarter, safer food systems.”

CMN


Glanbia, DFA, Select Milk announce Michigan plant site

Aug. 10, 2018

ST. JOHNS, Mich. — Glanbia Nutritionals, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and Select Milk Producers Inc. this week announced they have, subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions, selected the City of St. Johns, Michigan, as the preferred location for a new joint venture large-scale cheese and whey production facility for the state of Michigan, which is now expected to be commissioned in the fourth quarter of 2020 at a cost of $470 million.

The new facility will process 8 million pounds of milk per day into a range of cheese (300 million pounds per year) and whey products for U.S. and international markets, employing approximately 250 staff when in full production. In addition, the partners confirm that an agreement has been reached with Proliant Dairy Ingredients to process the whey permeate. Proliant will invest $85 million in an adjoining facility, creating up to 38 jobs.

The preferred site in St. Johns meets key selection criteria in terms of strategic location relative to milk supply, strong transport links, a positive business environment and labor availability, joint venture partners say.

Partners have engaged with Michigan state and city officials as well as community leaders to address issues such as cost, infrastructure and planning in order to finalize the decision. The Michigan Economic Development Corp. this week approved a package of incentives that address these areas.

“The finalization of the preferred location is a critical step on our journey to deliver a new ultra-modern dairy facility in Michigan,” says Brian Phelan, CEO, Glanbia Nutritionals. “We want to thank the state and city authorities for their continued support as we move to commence construction as soon as possible.”

Greg Wickham, CFO, DFA, adds that construction of this plant in St. Johns will not only address a growing industry need for Michigan plant capacity, but it also adds value and supports local dairy farm families in the area.

CMN


Blue Ribbon Dairy Products Auction raises $42,730

Aug. 10, 2018

WEST ALLIS, Wis. — Team Lake Country Dairy from Lake Country Dairy-Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, was named the 2018 Grand Master Cheesemaker during the Blue Ribbon Dairy Products Auction, held Thursday at Wisconsin State Fair Park. Lake Country Dairy earned the coveted title for the second year in a row with Altu, the first-place entry in the Smear Ripened Cheese Class.

Each blue ribbon entry from the contest sold during the event, which raised a total of $42,730 for student scholarships and dairy promotions at the Wisconsin State Fair.

DR Tech, Grantsburg, Wisconsin, purchased 22 pounds of Altu at last night’s auction for $145 per pound for a total of $3,190.

Full auction results include:

Mild Cheddar: DSM Food Specialties, Waukesha, purchased 42 pounds of Mild Cheddar made by Timothy Stearns, Agropur, Weyauwega, $120 per pound for a total of $5,040.

Swiss Styles: State Fair Park Foundation, West Allis, purchased a 12-pound Baby Swiss Wheel made by Shullsburg Team, Prairie Farms, Shullsburg, for $90 per pound for a total of $1,080.

Flavored Soft Cheese: Cheese Market News, Madison, purchased 10 pound of Marinated Fresh Mozzarella made by George Crave, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Waterloo, for $115 per pound for a total of $1,150.

Flavored Goat Milk Cheese: Dairy Connection, Madison, purchased 10 pounds of Cranberry Cinnamon Goat Cheese made by Doug Waechter, Saputo/Montchevre, Belmont, for $60 per pound for a total of $600.

Smoked Cheese: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 12 pounds of Smoked Aged Gouda made by Maple Leaf Cheesemakers, Maple Leaf Cheese, Monroe, for $95 per pound for a total of $1,140.

Flavored Hard Cheese: Wells Fargo, Milwaukee, purchased 20 pounds of Black Pepper BellaVitano made by Mike Matucheski, Sartori Co., Antigo, for $120 per pound for a total of $2,400.

Pasteurized Process, Cheese Food, Spread: Dairy Products Marketing, Fond du Lac, purchased 10 pounds of American Swiss Slices made by Slice Team, Associated Milk Producers Inc., Portage, for $170 per pound for a total of $1,700.

Open Class for Hard Cheese: Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 18 pounds of Traditional Romano made by Team Lake Country Dairy, Lake Country Dairy-Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, for $70 per pound for a total of $1,260.

Flavored Havarti: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Dill Havarti made by Ron Bechtolt, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $75 per pound for a total of $750.

String Cheese: WE Energies, Waukesha, purchased 10 pounds of Hand-Stretched String Cheese made by Cesar Luis, Cesar’s Cheese, Random Lake, for $125 per pound for a total of $1,250.

Flavored Semi-Soft Cheese: Masters Gallery Foods, Plymouth, purchased 10 pounds of Natural Flavor Provolone made by Team Clayton, Foremost Farms USA, Clayton, for $110 per pound for a total of $1,100.

Blue Veined Cheese: Novak’s Cheese, De Pere, purchased 14 pounds of Gorgonzola made by Team Seymour, Great Lakes Cheese, Seymour, for $60 per pound for a total of $840.

Salted Butter: Saz’s, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Salted Butter — Grand Champion Butter — made by Dan Stolte, Foremost Farms USA, Reedsburg, for $55 per pound for a total of $550.

Unsalted Butter: Rock River Laboratory, Watertown, purchased 10 pounds of Amish Style Hand-Rolled Butter made by Roy Philippi, Graf Creamery, Bonduel, for $105 per pound for a total of $1,050.

Open Class for Soft & Spreadable Cheese: DR Tech, Grantsburg, purchased 10 pounds of Mascarpone made by Team Lake Country Dairy, Lake Country Dairy-Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, for $60 per pound for a total of $600.

Colby, Monterey Jack: Wisconsin Aging and Grading, Kaukauna, purchased 10 pounds of Colby Jack Longhorn made by Bill Stocker, Shullsburg Creamery, Shullsburg, for $100 per pound for a total of $1,000.

Aged Cheddar: Masters Gallery Foods, Plymouth, purchased 40 pounds of Aged Cheddar made by Luke Kopecky, Land O’Lakes, Kiel, for $100 per pound for a total of $4,000.

Brick, Muenster: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Brick made by John (Randy) Pitman, Mill Creek Cheese, Arena, for $65 per pound for a total of $650.

Natural Goat Milk Cheese: Dairy Products Marketing, Fond du Lac, purchased 20 pounds of Extra-Aged Goat Cheese made by Pam Hodgson, Sartori Co., Plymouth, for $60 per pound for a total of $1,200.

Open Class for Flavored Sour Cream: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of French Onion Dip made by Westby Co-op Creamery Team, Westby Co-op Creamery, Westby, for $45 per pound for a total of $450.

Open Class for Unflavored Sour Cream: Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of La Chona Crema Natural made by Michael Godfrey, Mexican Cheese Producers, Darlington, for $20 per pound for a total of $200.

Lowfat Sour Cream: Wells Fargo, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Reduced Fat Greek French Onion Dip — Grand Champion Sour Cream — made by Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $45 per pound for a total of $450.

Mozzarella: Wisconsin Aging and Grading, Kaukauna, purchased 10 pounds of Mozzarella Whips made by Ben Shibler, Ron’s Wisconsin Cheese, Luxemburg, for $65 per pound for a total of $650.

Latin American Cheese: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Chihuahua Cheese made by Andy Rufener, Chula Vista Cheese/V&V Supremo, Browntown, for $40 per pound for a total of $400.

Open Class for Semi-Soft Cheese: Berenz Packaging, Menomonee Falls, purchased 10 pounds of Gouda made by Gary Grossen, Babcock Hall Dairy Plant, Madison, for $130 per pound for a total of $1,300.

Havarti: Berenz Packaging, Menomonee Falls, purchased 10 pounds of Havarti made by Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $100 per pound for a total of $1,000.

Sheep and Mixed Milk Cheese: Dairy Connection, Madison, purchased 12 pounds of Little Boy Blue made by Team Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co., Mineral Point, for $40 per pound for a total of $480.

Smear Ripened Cheese: DR Tech, Grantsburg, purchased 22 pounds of Altu — Grand Master Cheese Maker — made by Team Lake Country Dairy, Lake Country Dairy-Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, for $145 per pound for a total of $3,190.

Feta: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Feta in Brine made by Steve Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $100 per pound for a total of $1,000.

Cold Pack Cheese, Cheese Food: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Richfield, purchased 12 pounds of Swiss & Almond Cold Pack made by Team Pine River, Pine River Pre-Pack, Newton, for $150 per pound for a total of $1,800.

Flavored Pepper Cheese: Bunzel’s Meat Market, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Chili Pepper Muenster made by John (Randy) Pitman, Mill Creek Cheese, Arena, for $75 per pound for a total of $750.

Reduced Fat or Lite Cheese: Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Reduced Fat Provolone made by Team Clayton, Foremost Farms USA, Clayton, for $80 per pound for a total of $800.

Combined Class — Flavored High Protein Yogurt and Unflavored High Protein Yogurt: Ivarson Inc., Milwaukee, purchased a combined 10 pounds of Pomegranate Acai Yogurt and 10 pounds of Greek Yogurt made by Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $45 per pound for both lots for a total of $900.

Open Class for Flavored Yogurt: Ivarson Inc., Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Rhubarb Swiss Yogurt — Grand Champion Yogurt — made by Yodelay Yogurt, Madison, for $50 per pound for a total of $500.

Open Class for Unflavored Yogurt: Novak’s Cheese, De Pere, purchased 10 pounds of Plain Goat Milk Yogurt made by George Roehrig/Team LaClare, LaClare Family Creamery, Malone, for $25 per pound for a total of $250.

Drinkable Cultured Products: Wells Fargo, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Raspberry Flavored Kefir made by Nasonville Dairy, Marshfield, for $125 per pound for a total of $1,250.

CMN



Dairy stakeholders voice concerns on ongoing trade war

Aug. 10, 2018

WASHINGTON — China’s finance ministry recently announced plans to impose retaliatory tariffs on nearly $60 billion worth of U.S. imports, should the Trump administration follow through on its plans to place tariffs on another $200 billion in Chinese goods. The duties are the latest development in a series of retaliations between the two countries.

The Chinese are targeting lactose, infant formulas, ice cream, chocolate milk and whey proteins and isolates. The move means that nearly all U.S. dairy products exported to the country will face additional import taxes, notes the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA).

“This action will have a significant impact on IDFA members who export their products to our third-largest export market,” says Beth Hughes, IDFA senior director of international affairs. “IDFA will continue to communicate members’ concerns with top officials within the administration. We will also continue to promote equitable trade as one of our top priorities.”

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) this week released a list of approximately $16 billion worth of imports from China that will be subject to a 25 percent additional tariff. This second group of additional tariffs under Section 301 follows the initially announced tariffs on approximately $34 billion of imports from China, which went into effect July 6, USTR notes. USTR says that as in the case of the first tariff announcement, an upcoming notice in the Federal Register will announce a process by which interested persons may request the exclusion of particular products covered by a tariff line subject to the additional duties.

Last week, the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) released a “Written Statement for the Record” following a July 18 hearing on “The Effects of Tariffs on U.S. Agriculture and Rural Communities,” held by the House Committee on Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade.

“Our industry was cautiously optimistic at the beginning of the year and market analysts were predicting a price uptick in 2018. Unfortunately, we’ve instead seen a reversal in the nascent milk price recovery that was forming earlier this year and mounting barriers to our exports develop,” the statement says.

NMPF and USDEC say retaliation by China as well as Mexico is a driving factor in sustained economic pain.

They note that the U.S. government announcement of a $12 billion tariff relief package last month was an important step, but the details of the package are still being finalized, including how much each sector impacted by retaliatory tariffs will receive.

“No amount of assistance can replace the hard-fought markets that are being lost every day that retaliatory tariffs remain in place,” the statement says. “Moreover, the longer tariffs persist, the more difficult it will be to retain markets as our competitors work to seize the opportunity to expand their market share.”

This week, Farmers for Free Trade — a bipartisan campaign chaired by Sens. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., and Max Baucus, D-Mont., that is leading the fight against tariffs that are harming rural communities — announced a new $800,000 ag radio, print and TV ad buy highlighting tariffs’ impact on rural communities as part of a larger campaign.

The campaign, “Tariffs Hurt the Heartland,” is investing in local ads and town hall events, as well as raising awareness about financial and job losses tied to the ongoing trade war. The ads will be a mix of radio, TV and print and will run initially in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

“These ads will speak to American farmers who are watching the value of their hard work decrease every day as tariffs force the price of their crops and livestock downward,” says Sara Lilygren, president of the Farmers for Free Trade board.

CMN


Yo-yo market seeks stability in face of tariffs, cheese stocks

Aug. 3, 2018

By Alyssa Mitchell

MADISON, Wis. — Cheddar barrels at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) have experienced significant price swings in recent weeks as the U.S. dairy market faces tariff pressure and heavy cheese stocks.

USDA’s Dairy Market News notes CME barrel prices dropped 11-and-a-half cents Monday, “surprising few market participants, as contacts expected some price correction from last week’s buildup.

“Producers are slightly anxious but hopeful regarding some steadiness moving forward in the cheese markets,” Dairy Market News adds.

“Barrels have been struggling to strike a balance for much of the year, but the volatility of the past month has been significant,” says Sara Dorland, managing partner at Ceres Dairy Risk Management LLC, Seattle. “The market has swung from the $1.20s to the $1.40s nearly every other week since the start of July, and that is a wide range.”

CME block Cheddar has been a bit more stable, moving between $1.50 and $1.55 per pound for much of July and increasing to $1.5875 today.

Annie AcMoody, director of economic analysis for Western United Dairymen, says the combination of a bearish Cold Storage report for June and trade tariff announcements this summer have pressured cheese markets.

While heat in the Midwest in early July helped bring some market confidence back, tariffs are on market participants’ minds. With that and weather cooling off some in the Midwest, “the market sadly is not poised for a significant upward long-lasting price move,” she says.

At the same time, there is plenty of cheese available on the U.S. market, AcMoody says.

“Trade data has not yet shown how our export markets will be impacted by the tariffs, but as I mentioned, some of those concerns have already had an impact on daily prices,” she says. “Unless trade data comes out unscathed, I think the current price level is a likely outcome for the third quarter.”

Mike McCully, owner of The McCully Group LLC, New Buffalo, Michigan, says with the uncertainty surrounding cheese exports, domestic demand has not been strong enough to keep cheese supplies from bulging to new record highs.

However, U.S. cheese prices continue to trade at a discount to European and New Zealand prices, so that should keep exports moving, he says.

“There will be a seasonal downturn in stocks this fall, but it appears very large inventories will hang around, especially with more production capacity coming online over the next 6-9 months,” he adds.

Dorland says additional production capacity added over the past two years is one reason cheese stocks have increased, noting that American cheese stocks are flat, suggesting that most of the new growth is in the Italian cheese category. (For the latest Cold Storage data, see “Cheese stocks in cold storage set record in June” in last week’s issue of Cheese Market News.)

Meanwhile, the U.S. nonfat dry milk (NDM) market has strengthened a bit in recent weeks as hot weather in key powder-producing states has resulted in less milk, and therefore, less milk powder, McCully notes.

He adds that in Europe, hot, dry weather in several countries has negatively impacted milk output, so milk powder production is falling there as well.

“I think a lot of end-users are covered for most of the rest of 2018. There is still the issue of the mountain of old milk powder stocks in the European Union intervention program that they will try to aggressively sell,” McCully says. “I believe U.S. NDM prices can move into the $0.90s this year, but over $1 will take a more significant downturn in supply.”

At the same time, CME butter continues to show price strength, with analysts anticipating additional upward price movement this fall.

CME butter settled last week at $2.2625 per pound and has increased an additional 5.5 cents this week to settle at $2.32.

McCully says he is forecasting butter prices to trade in the $2.20s and $2.30s through the summer and fall.

“Falling European and New Zealand prices have taken the pressure off the U.S. market,” he says. “Stocks are more than adequate, although cream supplies have tightened up. The market seems mostly balanced at this point with the seasonal pickup in demand supporting slightly higher prices as we move into the fall.”

AcMoody adds since almost half of U.S. butter is produced in Western states — which are experiencing intense heat — she also expects price support for butter to continue in the coming months.

Looking ahead, analysts say a resolution of negotiations on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and removal of Mexican cheese tariffs would be bullish for U.S. cheese prices.

“Markets don’t like uncertainty, and a trade war brings all kinds of questions and uncertainty,” McCully says. “It has clearly been bearish for not only dairy markets, but other agricultural products as well.”

He adds that because most of the focus in the last two months has been on trade disputes with China and Mexico and higher tariffs for dairy products into those countries, fundamentals have taken a back seat just when it appears the global market was starting to tighten up.

“The weather in Europe and impact on milk is one of the main bullish watch-outs right now as are some hot spots in the U.S.,” McCully says. “The U.S. dairy market has factored in the bearish trade news, so any bullish surprise would cause U.S. prices to jump.”

CMN


Harbison from Cellars at Jasper Hill is ACS winner

Aug. 3, 2018

PITTSBURGH — Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont, won the top two awards at the American Cheese Society (ACS) 2018 Judging and Competition, which took place last week.

Jasper Hill’s Harbison, a soft-ripened cheese with a bloomy rind wrapped in spruce bark, was named Best of Show, while Calderwood, a variation of Jasper Hill’s Alpine-style Alpha Tolman coated with hay fibers, took Second Best of Show.

“What a thrill! These wins represent the efforts of many dedicated people from our cropping crew and herdsmen, through production and affinage, to sales and support,” says Mateo Kehler, cheesemaker, Cellars at Jasper Hill. “It took a village working in concert to pull this off.”

Harbison previously had been awarded Second Best in Show at the 2017 and 2015 ACS competitions.

Third Best in Show this year was awarded to COWS Creamery, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, for its Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar.

“This prestigious award for Avonlea is a true honor, and we’re very pleased to represent not just Prince Edward Island, but also Canada,” says Andrea White, wholesale manager, COWS Creamery.

This year’s contest featured a total 1,954 entries from 259 companies representing 35 U.S. states, five Canadian provinces, Mexico, Columbia and Brazil. The results were announced at a July 27 ceremony at the 35th annual ACS conference, “Forged in Cheese,” at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh.

“This year’s competition once again featured the very best cheeses and cheesemakers in the Americas,” says Nora Weiser, executive director, ACS. “This diversity of cheese displays the skill and passion of American cheesemakers. In taking two top honors, Cellars at Jasper Hill exemplifies how American artisan cheesemakers seamlessly meld tradition and innovation.”

The award-winning products in each category follow; some classes do not have first-place awards, and some include ties.

A. FRESH UNRIPENED CHEESES

AC: Open Category - Fresh Unripened Cheeses - made from cow’s milk
First: Brian Goodale, Chapel Hill Creamery, North Carolina, Dairyland Farmers.
Second: Mark Federico, Narragansett Creamery, Rhode Island, Crecenza/Stracchino.
Third: Jeremy Little, Sweet Grass Dairy, Georgia, LIL MOO.

AG: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from goat’s milk
First: Amaltheia Organic Dairy, Montana, Organic Whole Milk Ricotta.
First: Cypress Grover, California, Fromage Blanc.
Second: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Ricotta.
Third: Jean Rossard, Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Fromage Blanc.
Third: Paula Lambert, Mozzarella Co., Texas, Goats Milk Ricotta.

AH: Cheese Curds - all milks
First: Wayne Hintz, Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, Cheddar Curds.
Second: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagship Curds.
Second: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Cheddar Cheese Curds.
Third: William Hanson, Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Cheese Curds.

AM: Mascarpone and Cream Cheese - made from cow’s milk
First: Tom Pintar, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Crema di Mascarpone.
Second: Luana Team, Prairie Farms Dairy Cheese Division, Iowa, Cream Cheese 3-pound Loaf.
Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Thick and Smooth Mascarpone.

AQ: Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, and Quark - made from cow’s milk
Second: Vermont Creamery Cheesemakers Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Fromage Blanc.
Third: Vermont Creamery Cheesemakers Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Quark.

AR: Ricotta - made from cow’s milk
First: Greg Perkins, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Caputo Ricotta Cheese.
Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Hand Dipped Ricotta.
Third: Bill Codr, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Ricotta con Latte Whole Milk.

AS: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from sheep’s milk
Second: Stig Hansen, Tucker Family Farm, Montana, Ricotta.
Third: Jimmy Warren, Fruition Farms Creamery, Colorado, Sheep’s Milk Ricotta.

AX: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Ricotta di Bufala.
Second: Brian Schlatter, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Ricotta.
Third: Adan Rojas, BUF Creamery LLC, Cundinamarca, Colombia, BUF Ricotta.

B. SOFT RIPENED CHEESES

BA: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from cow’s milk
First: Mateo Kehler, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Harbison.
Second: MouCo Cheese Co. Inc., Colorado, MouCo Ashley.
Third: Gilbert Bourgoin, Savencia Cheese USA, Illinois, Dorothy Comeback Cow.

BB: Brie - made from cow’s milk
First: Emily Montgomery, Calkins Creamery, Pennsylvania, Noble Road.
First: Team Lena, Savencia Cheese USA, Illinois, Delice de France 17.6-ounce.
Second: Jesse Werner, Plymouth Artisan Cheese, Vermont, Ballyhoo.
Third: Old Europe Cheese, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Michigan, Joan of Arc Double Crème Brie.

BC: Camembert - made from cow’s milk
Second: Mt. Townsend Creamery, Washington, Cirrus.
Second: Old Europe Cheese, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Michigan, Joan of Arc Camembert.
Third: Israel Gil, Old Europe Cheese, Michigan, Camembert 8-ounce Wheels.

BG: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from goat’s milk
First: Vermont Creamery Aged Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Bonne Bouche.
Second: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Gris 1-pound.
Third: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ada’s Honor.

BS: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from sheep’s milk
First: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Hawkins Haze.
Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Woolly Rind.

BT: Triple Crème - soft ripened/cream added - all milks
First: Fons Smits, Tulip Tree Creamery, Indiana, Trillium.
Second: Marin French Cheese Co., California, Triple Crème Brie.
Third: Marin French Cheese Co., California, Triple Crème Brie 1-pound.
Third: Jack Rudolph, Stepladder Creamery, California, Ragged Point.

BX: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, Wegmans Food Markets, New York, Professor’s Brie.
Second: Brian Schlatter, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Hudson Valley Camembert Square.
Third: Samantha Genke and Alessandra Trompeo, Boxcarr Handmade Cheese, North Carolina, Cottonseed.

C. AMERICAN ORIGINALS

CB: Brick Cheese - made from cow’s milk
First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team, Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese.
Second: Ben Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Brick.
Third: Ron Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Brick.

CC: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from cow’s milk
First: Reggie Jones, Central Coast Creamery, California, Bishops Peak.
First: Marieke Gouda Cheese Team, Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Golden.
Second: Leslie Goff, Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Pawlet.
Second: Marin French Cheese Co., California, Petite Breakfast.
Second: Kuba Hemmerling, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Toma.
Third: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth Prairie Sunset Wheel.

CD: Dry Jack - made from cow’s milk
First: Sally Fallon Morell, P A Bowen Farmstead, Maryland, Aquasco Jack Reserve.
Second: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Peppercorn Dry Jack rBST Free.
Third: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Uncoated Dry Jack rBST Free.

CG: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from goat’s milk
First: Bobby Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Providence.
Second: Cypress Grove, California, Humboldt Fog Grande.
Third: Vermont Creamery Aged Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Coupole.

CJ: Monterey Jack - made from cow’s milk
Second: Tillamook Team 2, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Monterey Jack.
Third: John Fagundes, Fagundes Old-World Cheese, California, Hanford Jack.

CM: Brick Muenster - made from cow’s milk
First: Dave Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Muenster.
Second: Ben Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Muenster.
Second: Bruce Workman, Fair Oaks Farms, Wisconsin, Muenster.
Third: Team Comstock, Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Comstock Division, Wisconsin, Red Rind Muenster.

CS: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from sheep’s milk
First: Reggie Jones, Central Coast Creamery, California, Ewereka.
Third: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Ovella.
Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Bossa.

CT: Teleme - made from cow’s milk
Second: Joseph Reynoso, Peluso Cheese, California, Teleme Cheese.

CX: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from mixed or other milks
First: Lucille Giroux, La Moutonniere Inc., Québec, Sein D’Helene.
Second: Team Nettle Meadow, Nettle Meadow, New York, Briar Summit.
Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagsheep.

CY: Colby - made from cow’s milk
First: William Hanson, Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Colby.
Second: Pearl Valley Cheese, Ohio, Colby.
Third: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Robin.

D. AMERICAN MADE/INTERNATIONAL STYLE

DC: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from cow’s milk
First: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Tarentaise Reserve.
First: John Hoyt, Leelanau Cheese, Michigan, Aged Raclette.
Second: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Grand Cru Original Block.
Second: Matthew Brichford, Jacobs and Brichford Farmstead Cheese, Indiana, Everton Premium Reserve.
Third: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Grand Cru Reserve Block.

DD: Dutch-style (Gouda, Edam etc.) - all milks
First: Ben Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, 2-year aged Gouda.
Second: John Bulk, Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Mild Gouda.
Third: Rudy Yoder, Farmer Rudolph’s, Pennsylvania, Sir Farmer.
Third: Maple Leaf Cheese and Caves of Faribault Team, Prairie Farms-Caves of Faribault, Minnesota, Jeff’s Select Gouda.

DE: Emmental-style with Eye Formation (Swiss, Baby Swiss, Blocks, Wheels) - made from cow’s milk
Third: Pearl Valley Cheese, Ohio, Swiss Cheese.

DG: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from goat’s milk
First: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Pickering.
Second: Vermont Creamery Aged Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Bijou.
Third: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Goat’s Beard.

DS: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from sheep’s milk
First: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Wischago Reserve.
Second: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Pecora Nocciola.
Third: Maria Schumann, Cate Hill Orchard, Vermont, Wild Mountain Tomme.

DX: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Consider Bardwell Farm, Crown Finish Caves, Vermont, Goatlet.
Second: Mike Matucheski, Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Limited Edition Pastorale Blend.
Third: Grafton Village Cheesemakers, Grafton Village Cheese, Vermont, Shepsog.

E. CHEDDARS

EA: Aged Cheddar - aged 13 months through 23 months - all milks
First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, English Hollow Cheddar.
Second: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, 2-year-old Cheddar.
Second: Tillamook Team 1, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Cape Meares Cheddar.
Third: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Extra Old Cheddar.
Third: Tillamook Team 1, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Sharp Cheddar.
Third: Rick Woods & Team, Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Governors Cheddar.

EB: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen - aged 13 or more months - all milks
First: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar.
Second: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagship Reserve.
Second: Rick Woods, Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Cloth Bound Windsordale.
Third: Mariano Gonzalez, Fiscalini Cheese Co., California, Extra Mature Bandage Wrapped Cheddar.

EC: Cheddar - aged through 12 months - made from cow’s milk
First: Team Slice, Shelburne Farms, Vermont, Shelburne Farms’ 6 Month Cheddar.
Second: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Fawn.
Third: Bothwell Cheese, Manitoba, Bothwell Non-GMO Cheddar - Medium.

EE: Mature Cheddar - aged 48 or more months - all milks
Second: Kevin Schwartz, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek 5-Year Private Reserve Specialty Cheddar.
Third: Team Cabot Creamery, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Old School Cheddar.
Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team, Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, 4-Year Aged Cheddar.

EG: Cheddar - aged through 12 months - made from goat’s, sheep’s, buffalo’s, mixed, or other milk
First: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Goat Cheddar.
Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Caprae Raw Milk Goat Cheddar.
Third: Jean Rossard, Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Goat Milk Cheddar.

EW: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen - aged through 12 months - all milks
First: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Clothbound Cheddar.
Second: Montchevre, Crown Finish Caves, Wisconsin, Bandaged Goat.
Third: Mike Brennenstuhl, Door Artisan Cheese Co. LLC, Wisconsin, Top Hat English Truckle Cheddar.
Third: Mariano Gonzalez, Fiscalini Cheese Co., California, Bandage Wrapped Cheddar.

EX: Mature Cheddar - aged 24 months through 47 months - all milks
First: Tillamook Team 1, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook 3-Year Vintage Extra Sharp White Cheddar.
Second: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, 3 Year Old Cheddar.
Third: Parmalat Canada Inc., Lactalis American Group, Ontario, 40-pound Black Diamond White Cheddar 3-year Block.

F. BLUE MOLD CHEESES

FC: Rindless Blue-veined - made from cow’s milk
First: Caves of Faribault Team, Prairie Farms-Caves of Faribault, Minnesota, AmaGorg Gorgonzola.
Second: Saputo Cheese USA Inc., Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Gorgonzola Cheese.
Second: Saputo Cheese USA Inc., Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Reserve Blue Cheese.
Third: Kuba Hemmerling, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Wisconsin, California Coastal Blue.

FE: External Blue-molded cheeses - all milks
First: Kim Hayes, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Bluebonnet.
Second: Kim Hayes, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Classic Blue Log.
Third: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Blue Barns.

FK: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from cow’s milk
First: Mateo Kehler, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Bayley Hazen Blue.
Second: RC Blue Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Caveman Blue Cheese.
Third: Amy Turnbull and Team Willapa Hills, Willapa Hills Cheese, Washington, Big Boy Blue.

FL: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from goat’s milk
Second: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Blue Velvet.
Third: Pete Messmer, Lively Run Dairy, New York, Cayuga Blue.

FS: Rindless Blue-veined - made from sheep’s milk
First: Eric Anderson and Greg Backes, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Ewe’s Blue.
Third: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Little Boy Blue.

FX: Rindless Blue-veined - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, EWE CALF to be KIDding Blue.
Third: Mark Ruttner, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Gorgonzola with Sheep’s Milk.
Third: RC Blue Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Echo Mountain Blue Cheese.

FZ: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from mixed, or other milks
Third: Erika McKenzie-Chapter, Pennyroyal Farm, California, Boonter’s Blue.

G. HISPANIC & PORTUGUESE STYLE CHEESES

GA: Ripened, Aged over 90 days - all milks
First: Jackie Chang, Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Gold Hill.
Second: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth GranQueso Original Wheel.
Third: Sam Ram, Rizo Lopez Foods Inc., California, Cotija.

GC: Fresh, Unripened - all milks
Second: Francisco Ochoa, Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Panela.
Third: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Oaxaca.

GM: Cooking Hispanic - Cheeses intended to be consumed heated or melted - all milks
First: Queso Menonita, Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Menonita.
First: Quesos Navarro, Jalisco, Mexico, Manchego Mexicano Navarro.
Second: Sam Ram, Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, RBCC Oaxaca.
Third: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies Inc., California, Para Freir.

H. ITALIAN TYPE CHEESES

HA: Grating types (Aged Asiago, Domestic Parmesan, Grana, Reggianito, Sardo; Romano made only from cow’s or goat’s milk) - all milks
First: Tim Dudek, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Parmesan.
Second: Steve Bierhals, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso American Grana.
Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Traditional Romano Cheese.
Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Hand Crafted Asiago Cheese.

HB: Burrata - Fresh Mozzarella encasing a distinctly separate core made from softer curd and cream, or other soft cheese - all milks
First: Jorge Aguas, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Caputo Burrata.
Second: Jorge Aguas, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Caputo Burratini.
Third: Lioni Latticini Inc., New Jersey, Lioni Burrata Con Panna.

HD: Traditional Regional Italian Cheeses - all milks
First: Peter Dixon and Rachel Fritz Schaal, Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Reverie.
Second: Peter Dixon and Rachel Fritz Schaal, Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Vermont Herdsman.
Third: Shawn Duffy and Matteo Lovera, Lovera’s Market, Oklahoma, Tomina Vecchia.

HM: Mozzarella types (Brick, Scamorza, String Cheese) - all milks
First: Ben Shibler, Ponderosa Dairy Products, Wisconsin, Ponderosa Farmstead Cheese Whips.
Second: Ben Shibler, Ponderosa Dairy Products, Wisconsin, Ponderosa Farmstead String Cheese.
Third: Ferndale Farmstead Team, Ferndale Farmstead Creamery, Washington, Scamorza.

HP: Pasta Filata types (Provolone, Caciocavallo) - all milks
Second: Mozzarella Team, Lactalis American Group, New York, Mild Provolone.
Third: Lovera’s Cheese Co., Lovera’s Market, Oklahoma, Aged Caciocavera.

HY: Fresh Mozzarella - 8 oz. or More (Balls or Shapes) - all milks
First: Adan Rojas, BUF Creamery LLC, Cundinamarca, Colombia, BUF Mezza Libra.
Second: Jared Ruechel, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Fresh Mozzarella 8-ounce Ball Thermoform.
Third: Kuba Hemmerling, point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Fresh Mozzarella.

HZ: Fresh Mozzarella - Under 8 oz. (Ovalini, Bocconcini, Ciliegine sizes) - all milks
First: Jorge Aguas, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Caputo Nodini.
Second: Joel McGratt, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Fresh Mozzarella Snacking Cheese Thermoform.
Third: Mark Federico, Narragansett Creamery, Rhode Island, Narragansett Creamery Fresh Mozzarella - Ovolini.

I. FETA CHEESES

IC: Feta - made from cow’s milk
First: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Feta in Brine.
Second: Lino Esposito, Belfiore Cheese Co., California, Feta Cheese in Brine.
Third: Chris Gallant, Maplebrook Farm, Vermont, Whole Milk Block Feta.
Third: Sarah Wiederkehr, Winter Hill Farm, Maine, Feta.

IG: Feta - made from goat’s milk
First: Anne Doe, Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Greek Style Feta.
Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Bella Capra Goat Feta.
Second: Deborah Stone, Stone Hollow Farmstead, Alabama, Goat Feta.
Third: Pieter vanOudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Celebrity Feta.
Third: Sarah Marcus, Briar Rose Creamery, Oregon, Goat Milk Feta.

IS: Feta - made from sheep’s milk
First: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Farmstead Feta.
Second: Jimmy Warren, Fruition Farms Creamery, Colorado, Sheep’s Milk Feta.
Second: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Farmstead Feta Reserve.
Third: Stig Hansen, Tucker Family Farm, Montana, Feta.

J. LOWFAT/LOW SALT CHEESES

JL: Fat Free and Low Fat cheeses - all milks
Third: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Low Fat Cheddar.

JR: Light/Lite and Reduced Fat cheeses - all milks
First: Steve Webster, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Feta.
Second: Fritz Kaiser, Fromages CDA Inc., Québec, Zurigo.
Second: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Reduced Fat Gouda.
Third: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Mabel.

K. FLAVORED CHEESES

KA: Fresh Unripened Cheese with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Marie-Laure Couët, Couët Farm & Fromagerie LLC, Massachusetts, Fran de Maquis.
Second: Marie-Laure Couët, Couët Farm & Fromagerie LLC, Massachusetts, Truffle Adelisca.
Third: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Apricot Honey Fromage Blanc.

KB: Soft-Ripened with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Team Lena, Savencia Cheese USA, Illinois, Alouette Black Truffle Petite Brie.
Second: Sheila Flanagan and Sal Speights, Nettle Meadow, New York, Sappy Ewe.
Third: Fromagerie Alexis De Portneuf, Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Québec, Lady Laurier d’Arthabaska.

KC: Open Category - Cheeses with Flavor Added - all milks and mixed milks
First: Fons Smits, Tulip Tree Creamery, Indiana, Hops.
Second: Bryan Springborn, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Black Truffle Burrata.
Third: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Blackstone.

KD: International-Style with Flavor Added - all milks
First: John Bulk, Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Cumin Gouda.
First: Tumino Cheese Co., New York, Kidders.
Second: Lindsay and Jeff Slevin, Twin Sisters Creamery, Washington, Twin Sisters Farmhouse with Whole Peppercorns.
Second: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Pepito.
Third: Ron Bechtolt, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Dill Havarti.
Third: Walter Nicolau III, Nicolau Farms Inc., California, Black Truffle Casiago.

KE: Cheddar with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Brandon Kling and Courtney Covell, High Country Creamery, Maryland, Sparky’s Fury.
Second: Brandon Kling and Courtney Covell, High Country Creamery, Maryland, Peppercorn Cheddar.
Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Marco Polo Reserve.

KF: Farmstead Cheese with Flavor Added (must conform to all guidelines in Category M) - all milks
First: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Claire’s Mandell Hill.
Second: Mariano Gonzalez, Fiscalini Cheese Co., California, Hopscotch.
Third: Aaron Langdon, Nicasio Valley Cheese Co., California, Foggy Morning with Garlic and Basil.

KG: Hispanic-Style with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Mauricio Travesi, Mozzarella Co., Texas, Menonina Jalapeño.
Second: Jamie Graca, Karoun Dairies Inc., California, Para Freir with Jalapeno.
Second: Team Chula Vista, V&V Supremo Foods, Wisconsin, Queso Chihuahua with Jalapeno Peppers.
Third: Francisco Ochoa, Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Botanero Cilantro y Jalapeno.
Third: UConn Creamery Team, University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science Creamery, Connecticut, Chipotle Queso Blanco.
Third: UConn Creamery Team, University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science Creamery, Connecticut, Green Chile Queso Blanco.

KI: Feta with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Steve Webster, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Tomato & Basil Feta.
Second: Steve Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Peppercorn Feta.
Third: Luke Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Mediterranean Feta.

KJ: Reduced Fat Cheese with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Steve Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Tomato & Basil Feta.
First: Luke Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Peppercorn Feta.
Second: Team Coach Farm, Coach Farm, New York, Coach Farm Reduced Fat Fresh Goat Cheese with Pepper.
Third: Chris Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Pesto Farmers Cheese.

KK: Rubbed-Rind Cheese with added flavor ingredients rubbed or applied on the exterior surface of the cheese only - all milks
First: Mateo Kehler, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Calderwood.
First: Mozzarella Co., Texas, Cella.
Second: Warren Buchanan, Beehive Cheese Co. LLC, Utah, Promontory with Kendall Jackson Stature Cabernet Sauvignon Must.
Third: Kelly Harding and Mat Rychorcewicz, Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Pennsylvania, Cowboy Coffee.

KL: Cheese Curds with Flavor Added - all milks
First: William Hanson, Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Buffalo Wing Cheese Curd.
Second: Nathan P. Hemme, Hemme Brothers Creamery, Missouri, Garlic Dill Cheese Curds.
Third: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Pizza Curds.
Third: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, In Your Face Spicy 3 Pepper Curds.

KM: Monterey Jack with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Jack the Reaper.
Second: Bothwell Cheese, Manitoba, Bothwell Jalapeño Monterey Jack.
Third: Team Comstock, Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Comstock Division, Wisconsin, Ghost Pepper Jack.

KN: Fresh Goat Cheese with Flavor Added - 100% goat’s milk
First: Regina Bryant, Goats and Gourmets, New York, Chevre with Basil Pesto.
Second: Aurelien Jolly, Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Fresh Goat Cheese Peppadew.
Third: Cypress Grove, California, PsycheDillic.
Third: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Pastures with garlic and herbs.
Third: Aurelien Jolly, Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Fresh Goat Cheese Honey.

KO: Sheep Cheese with Flavor Added - 100% sheep’s milk
First: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Pepato.
Second: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Garlic Peppercorn.
Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Rosemary.

KQ: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Set yogurts, Greek-style, dips, etc.) - all milks
First: Justin Lowery, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Pomegranate Acai Greek Yogurt.
Second: Tim Imbriaco, Annabella, Antioquia, Colombia, Water Buffalo Yogurt - Strawberry.
Third: Tim Imbriaco, Annabella, Antioquia, Colombia, Water Buffalo Yogurt - Blackberry.

KR: Butter with Flavor Added - all milks
First: Blain Hages, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Herbed Rose Butter.
Second: Minerva Butter Team, Minerva Dairy, Ohio, Maplewood Smoked Amish Roll Butter.
Third: Debra La Fleur, Shatto Milk Co., Missouri, Garlic Butter.

KS: Cold Pack Cheese and Spreads with Flavor Added - with a maximum moisture of 42% - all milks
First: Matthew Pivnick and Christine Woodarek, Key Ingredient Market, Wisconsin, White Truffle Cheddar Spread.
Second: Matthew Pivnick and Christine Woodarek, Key Ingredient Market, Wisconsin, Three Cheese Sun Dried Tomato Spread.
Third: Kuba Hemmerling, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, The Fork Pimento Cheese.

KV: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Drinkable, pourable, smoothie, etc.) - all milks
First: Team Coach Farm, Coach Farm, New York, Yo-Goat, Mango Peach.
Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Peach Drinkable Yogurt.
Third: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Pina Colada Drinkable Yogurt.

L. SMOKED CHEESES

LC: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from cow’s milk
Second: Caves of Faribault Team, Prairie Farms-Caves of Faribault, Minnesota, Smoked AmaBlu Blue Cheese.
Third: Marieke Gouda Cheese Team, Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Smoked.
Third: RC Blue Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Smokey Blue Cheese.

LD: Smoked Cheddars - all milks
First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Smoked Aged Cheddar.
Second: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Smokey Cheddar.
Third: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Appletree Smoked Cheddar.

LG: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from goat’s milk
Second: Jackie Chang, Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Applewood Smoke Chevre.
Third: Carrie and Bobby Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Smokey Mountain Round.

LM: Smoked Italian Styles (Mozzarella, Scamorza, Bocconcini, Ovalini, etc.) - all milks
First: Dairy Farmers of America, Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Smoked Mozzarella rBST Free.
Second: Global Foods International Inc., Illinois, Double Oven Smoked Mozzarella.
Third: Ferndale Farmstead Team, Ferndale Farmstead Creamery, Washington, Smoked Scamorza

LX: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from mixed, or other milks
Third: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Smoked Faarko.

M. FARMSTEAD CHEESES

MA: Farmstead Category Aged less than 60 days - all milks
Second: Matt Benham, Arethusa Farm Dairy, Connecticut, Camembert.
Third: Matt Benham, Arethusa Farm Dairy, Connecticut, Karlie’s Gratitude.

MC: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - 39% or higher moisture - made from cow’s milk
First: Rick Woods and Team, Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Lille Coulommiers Bebe.
Second: Mark Gillman, Cato Corner Farm LLC, Connecticut, Womanchego.
Second: Sean Fitzgerald, Cherry Grove Farm, New Jersey, Rarebird.
Third: Alexander Kast, Chapel Hill Creamery, North Carolina, Hickory Grove.
Third: Sequatchie Cove Creamery, Tennessee, Dancing Fern.

ME: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - less than 39% moisture - made from cow’s milk
First: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Tarentaise.
Second: Cricket Creek Farm, Massachusetts, Maggie’s Reserve.
Second: Matthew Brichford, Jacobs and Brichford Farmstead Cheese, Indiana, Everton.
Third: Samuel Kennedy and Matt Hettlinger, The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, St. Malachi.

MG: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from goat’s milk
First: Charuth Van Beuzekom, Dutch Girl Creamery, Nebraska, Rosa Maria.
Second: Leslie Goff, Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Manchester.
Third: Anne Doe, Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Très Bonne Reserve

MS: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from sheep’s milk
First: Otterbein Acres Farm, Revittle, Pennsylvania, Shepherd’s Delight.
Second: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Ocooch.
Third: Kendall Russell and Hannah Walker, Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Montana Alto.

MX: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Samuel Kennedy and Matthew Hettlinger, The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, The Creamery Collection Batch #13.
Second: Erika McKenzie-Chapter, Pennyroyal Farm, California, Boont Corners 2-Month.
Third: Otterbein Acres Farm, Revittle, Pennsylvania, Shepherd’s Alpine.

N. GOAT’S MILK CHEESES

NO: Fresh Rindless Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (black ash coating permitted)
First: Amelia Sweethardt, Pure Luck Farm and Dairy, Texas, Chevre.
Second: Woolwich Dairy, Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Ontario, Woolwich Dairy Goat Milk Mozzarella.
Third: Russell Hannula, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Plain Capri.

NS: Fresh Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (hand-shaped, formed or molded into pyramid, disc, drum, crottin, basket or other shape)
First: Vermont Creamery, Wegmans Food Markets, Vermont, 1916.
Second: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ellie’s Cloudy Down.
Third: Capriole Team, Capriole, Indiana, Sophia.
Third: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Gris 3-pound.

NT: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days
First: Fromagerie Alexis De Portneuf, Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Québec, Le Cendrillon.
Second: The Baetje Farms Team, Baetje Farms LLC, Missouri, Bloomsdale.
Third: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Brothers’ Walk.

NU: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days
First: Dan Porter, FireFly Farms, Maryland, Merry Goat Round Spruce Reserve.
Second: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ode to Joy.
Third: Pam Hodgson, Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat.

O. SHEEP’S MILK CHEESES

OO: Fresh Rindless Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days
First: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Petit Nuage.
Second: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Brebis.
Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Plain.

OT: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days
First: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Magnolia.
Second: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Dirt Lover.
Second: Colleen Histon, Shepherds Manor Creamery, Maryland, Shepherds Manor Dottie Tomme.
Third: Fromagerie La Vache à Maillotte, Fromages CDA Inc., Québec, L’Allegretto.

OU: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days
First: Reggie Jones, Central Coast Creamery, California, Ewenique.
Second: Stig Hansen, Tucker Family Farm, Montana, Harbinger.
Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Sheep Sheep.
Third: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, San Andreas.

P. MARINATED CHEESES

PC: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients - made from cow’s milk
First: Brian and Rebeccah Salmeri, Brush Creek Creamery, Idaho, Marinated Labneh.
First: Brian and Rebeccah Salmeri, Brush Creek Creamery, Idaho, Roasted Garlic Labneh.
Second: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Marinated Fresh Mozzarella.
Third: Davide Toffolon, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, La Bottega di BelGioioso Artigiano Aged Balsamic & Cipolline Onion.
Third: Caves of Faribault Team, Prairie Farms-Caves of Faribault, Minnesota, Summertime Blues - Blues and Brews Series.

PG: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients - made from goat’s milk
Second: Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Herb Cabecou 3.5 pounds.
Third: Gerard Tuck, CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Tupelo Honey & Lime.

Q. CULTURED MILK AND CREAM PRODUCTS

QD: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from goat’s milk
Second: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Plain Goat Milk Yogurt.
Third: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Rich & Creamy Goat Yogurt.

QF: Crème Fraiche and Sour Cream Products - made from cow’s milk
First: Team New Holland, Savencia Cheese USA, Pennsylvania, Alouette Crème Fraîche.
Second: Team Cabot Creamery, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Sour Cream.
Third: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Crème Fraiche.

QK: Kefir, Drinkable Yogurt, Buttermilk, and Other Drinkable Cultured Products - all milks
First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Fresa Drinkable Yogurt.
Third: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies Inc., California, Karoun Whole Milk Kefir Drink.

QL: Labneh, Greek Style Yogurt, and Other Strained Cultured Products - all milks
First: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Cultured Classics Creme (labne) Kefir.
Second: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Traditional.
Third: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies Inc., California, Karoun Labneh.

QS: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from sheep’s milk
First: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Plain Sheep Yogurt.
Second: Laura Distefano, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - Plain.
Third: Jimmy Warren, Fruition Farms Creamery, Colorado, Sheepskyr.

QX: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from mixed, or other milks
Third: Tim Imbriaco, Annabella, Antioquia, Colombia, Water Buffalo Yogurt - Plain.

QY: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from cow’s milk
Second: Chris Casiello, Arethusa Farm Dairy, Connecticut, Whole Milk Plain Yogurt.
Third: Saint Benoit Creamery, Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Organic Original Yogurt.

R. BUTTERS

RC: Salted Butter with or without cultures - made from cow’s milk
First: Vermont Creamery Butter Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Lightly Salted Cultured Butter.
Second: Blain Hages, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Gray Salt Butter.
Third: COWS Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Cultured Butter.

RM: Butter with or without cultures - made from goat’s milk
Second: Pieter vanOudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Celebrity Goat’s Milk Butter.

RO: Unsalted Butter with or without cultures - made from cow’s milk
First: Blain Hages, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Unsalted Cultured Butter.
Second: Winchester Butter Team, Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Lactantia Premium Cultured Salted Butter.
Third: Roy M. Philippi, Graf Creamery Inc., Wisconsin, Brethren Butter Amish Style Handrolled Unsalted Butter.

S. CHEESE SPREADS

SC: Open Category Cold Pack Style - with a maximum moisture of 42% - all milks
First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team, Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese Spread (Cold Pack).
Second: Dave Zielazowski, Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, Black Diamond Extra Sharp Cheddar Spreadable Cheese.
Third: Jean Rossard, Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Oh-La-La! Fresh Spreadable Goat Cheese.
Third: Phil Lindemann, Pine River Pre-Pack Inc., Wisconsin, Chunky Bleu Cold Pack Cheese Food.

T. WASHED RIND CHEESES

TB: Soft-Ripened Washed Rind - high moisture over 42% - all milks
First: Fromagerie Alexis De Portneuf, Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Québec, La Sauvagine.
Second: Dan Patel, Atalanta Corp./Quality Cheese Inc., Ontario, Bon Secret.
Third: Mateo Kehler, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Willoughby.

TC: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - cow’s milk
First: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth Cellars Pavino Cheese Wheel.
Second: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Ashbrook.
Second: Uplands Cheese, Wisconsin, Pleasant Ridge Reserve.
Third: Team Emmi Roth, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth Organic Grand Cru Reserve Wheel.

TG: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - goat’s milk
First: Leslie Goff, Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Slyboro.
Second: Kelly Harding and Mat Rychorcewicz, Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Pennsylvania, Bamboozle.
Third: Dan Porter, Firefly Farms, Maryland, Cabra LaMancha.

TR: Raclette-style - Aged over 45 days - all milks
First: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Reading.
First: Affinuer David Rogers, Cheesemaker Jennifer Kutz and Team LaClare, LaClare Family Creamery, Wisconsin, LaClare Farms Grevalon.
Second: Jackie Chang, Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Snowmass Raclette.
Third: Fromagerie Alexis De Portneuf, Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Québec, Cantonnier Cheese.

TS: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - made from sheep’s milk
Second: Grafton Village Cheesemakers, Grafton Village Cheese, Vermont, Bear Hill.
Third: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Timber Coulee Reserve.

TX: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - made from mixed, or other milks
First: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Aux Arcs.
Second: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Meadow Melody Reserve.
Second: Ashley Coffey, Tomales Farmstead Creamery, California, Atika.
Third: Pieter vanOudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Lenberg Farms Classic Reserve by Celebrity, Zoey.

CMN


Total cheese production up in June by 1.8 percent

Aug. 3, 2018

WASHINGTON — Total U.S. cheese production, excluding cottage cheese, in June was 1.06 billion pounds, up 1.8 percent from June 2017 but 1.9 percent below May 2018, according to USDA’s Dairy Production report released Thursday by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Dairy Production chart on page 26.)

When adjusted for the length of the months, total June cheese production was up 1.4 percent from May 2018 on an average daily basis.

Production of Mozzarella, the nation’s most-produced cheese, was up 1.4 percent from the previous June to 354.4 million pounds. Total Italian-type production, of which Mozzarella is the largest component, was down 0.1 percent from the previous June to 449.7 million pounds. In the Italian-type cheese category, production of Parmesan, Provolone and “other Italian types” were down from a year earlier.

Cheddar production totaled 314.1 million pounds in June, a 4.0-percent increase from June 2017. Production of American-type cheeses, of which Cheddar is the largest component, totaled 430.5 million pounds, up 2.7 percent from a year earlier.

Wisconsin led the nation’s cheese production with 276.5 million pounds in June, down 0.7 percent from its production a year earlier. California followed with 205.0 million pounds, down 1.1 percent from June 2017.

NASS reports total U.S. butter production in June was 143.5 million pounds, up 3.1 percent from June 2017 but down 14.7 percent from May 2018. Taking the length of the months into account, June butter production was down 11.8 percent from May on an average daily basis.

California led the nation’s butter production with 44.5 million pounds in June, an increase of 9.5 percent from its production a year earlier.

CMN



Wisconsin earns world title with big cheeseboard

Aug. 3, 2018

MADISON, Wis. — Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin made history on Wednesday by creating the World’s Largest Cheeseboard, officially setting a new Guinness World Records title. Spanning 35 feet long and 7 feet wide, the board took over an entire street in downtown Madison, Wisconsin, displaying more than two tons of Wisconsin cheeses from across the state, topping the previous European record holder by more than 1,000 pounds.

The custom board was officially adorned with 4,437 pounds and 145 different varieties, types and styles of Wisconsin’s unique specialty and artisan cheeses, including national and international award winners. A 2,000-pound Cheddar wheel from Henning’s Cheese was the grand centerpiece, surrounded by blue-veined cheeses, cave aged Cheddars, Brick and Feta, squeaky curds, hand-rubbed wheels and the 2017 U.S. Cheese Champion, Sartori Black Pepper BellaVitano, among others.

“When we were at South by Southwest (SXSW) a few months ago, we created the unofficial world’s longest cheese board, and the amount of PR we received and the notoriety from around the globe was incredible,” says Chad Vincent, CEO of Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin.
Vincent says Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin then learned about the official world record for the World’s Longest Cheeseboard.

“We decided it has to be done in Madison, Wisconsin, the epicenter for cheese,” he says.
“We wanted to showcase the amazing breadth of the award-winning cheeses in Wisconsin and we thought — what better way to do that than to create the world’s largest cheeseboard,” adds Suzanne Fanning, Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin vice president of marketing communications. “Wisconsin’s licensed cheesemakers put the art in artisan, drawing from their rich European heritage, cheesemaking traditions and impressive innovations, and we’re thrilled to share their masterful creations with the world in a unique and fun way.”

The cheeseboard was custom made to fit inside a life-size, digitally fabricated barn, using CNC technology — a computerized process that’s a cross between woodcutting and 3-D printing — by Better Block Foundation, a nonprofit that uses urban design to foster community.

Fanning notes it was a true team effort — taking more than 60 people to prep, transport, house, style and weigh all of the cheeses.

Following the official judging ceremony by Guinness World Records adjudicator Mike Marcotte, a crowd of more than 45,000 attendees got to check out the board, and the first 2,000 guests in line received a curated cheese plate to go.

Spectators also entered a raffle to win full wheels of cheese with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the Great American Milk Drive. The remaining cheese was donated to the Second Harvest Foodbank of Southern Wisconsin, both benefiting families in need. (To view more photos and live video from this event, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/cheesemarketnews.)

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Today's Cheese Spot Trading
August 21, 2018


Barrels:$1.5700 (-7 1/4)
Blocks: $1.6175 (+3/4)


Click here for more market activity
Cheese Production
U.S. Total June
1.064 bil. lbs.


Milk Production
U.S. Total June
18.270 bil. lbs.

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Three million hours:
A terrible thing to waste

Hill Pratt, Blimling and Associates Inc.

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